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Question

720p vs 1080p in regards to streaming/spooling times

by Spyro313 / October 11, 2013 4:13 AM PDT

So, I'm wanting to get a 42-inch HDTV and go exclusively to online content watching (Netflix, Hulu, etc) to get rid of my satellite tv bill. The problem is that I live in a rural area and currently I'm only able to get internet speed at 1.5 mbs. Right now I have netflix on my old TV and during busy times a movie or show may need to spool for a few minutes. I saw one review from a person who got the TV I was looking at (an LG smart TV 1080p), and she said she lived in a rural area and watched Netflix and it took a long time to spool, so she switched to a 720p TV. I have no idea what her internet speed was and before I buy a new TV, I'm wondering if I will run into this. I can't find any information. Does anyone else have experience with this? Thanks.

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All Answers

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Answer
I would not count on this to work.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / October 11, 2013 4:42 AM PDT

Most tvs have little memory to spool into so you might be upset to find out later how much buffer a tv has.

OK, let's get some numbers.

https://support.netflix.com/en/node/87
https://support.netflix.com/en/node/306

As the second link reveals you at half the speed to get DVD or 480 line quality.
The first link we can work backwards from the low setting to get 5 megabit per second. So here's the information and why I suggest you keep a PC in the loop for this since it will have the needed disk and buffer space to make it work.
Bob

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So to clarify what you are saying...
by Spyro313 / October 11, 2013 6:15 AM PDT

Thank you for responding...so much appreciated Happy
When you say "don't count on this to work..." Do you mean the HDTV part of it, or the smart TV part of it?
If I connect my laptop or ipad to an HDTV and stream through that, would it work....or I should just give up on the idea of an HDTV at the moment (or, at least the idea of getting rid of the cable bill and watching all internet content if I go for a new TV)? Whew...sorry. That's like a 3-part question.
sarah

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Ouch, even more won't work.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / October 11, 2013 6:26 AM PDT

watching all internet content could mean you expected the smart tv's BROWSER to work as good as a common Windows 98 Browser?

Sorry, that's another failure in some folk's opinion. Read this:
http://forums.cnet.com/7723-13973_102-571556/wh-samsung-smart-tv-web-browser-closed-uneexpectedly/?messageId=5354305&tag=rb_content;forums06#message5354305

I supplied the links to show what speed you needed for Netflix and since we know the TV has so little ram and no disk space that buffer could fill and then play until it's empty and this may get you a few minutes till it halts.

I fear you are not going to be happy with today's smart TVs here. However if you have a PC and it works, you could put that on your TV with some HDMI cord.
Bob

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