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See Tiger Woods back golfing nine months after car rollover crash

Golfer's three-second video has been watched millions of times.

Gael Cooper
CNET editor Gael Fashingbauer Cooper, a journalist and pop-culture junkie, is co-author of "Whatever Happened to Pudding Pops? The Lost Toys, Tastes and Trends of the '70s and '80s," as well as "The Totally Sweet '90s." She's been a journalist since 1989, working at Mpls.St.Paul Magazine, Twin Cities Sidewalk, the Minneapolis Star Tribune, and NBC News Digital. She's Gen X in birthdate, word and deed. If Marathon candy bars ever come back, she'll be first in line.
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Gael Cooper

Golfer Tiger Woods shared a video on Twitter on Sunday that's just three seconds long, but those three seconds received 7 million views in about a day and a half. In the video, Woods is seen practicing his golf swing, while wearing what appears to be a compression sleeve on one leg. He captioned the video "Making progress."

Woods, 45, was seriously injured in February when he rolled his SUV in Los Angeles, requiring surgery. Los Angeles County Sheriff Alex Villanueva later said Woods was driving between 84 and 87 miles per hour in a 45-mile-per-hour zone.

Fellow pro golfer Phil Mickelson responded to Woods' tweet with encouragement and a challenge.

"As I'm hanging in Montana, it's great to see Tiger swinging a golf club again," Mickelson tweeted. "I know he can't stand me holding a single record so I'm guessing HE wants to be the oldest to ever win a major. I'll just say this. BRING IT!"

Back in May, Woods told Golf Digest that his rehabilitation after the crash was tough.

"I understand more of the rehab processes because of my past injuries, but this was more painful than anything I have ever experienced," he told the magazine.

It's unknown when Woods might be able to return to the PGA tour, although People magazine recently quoted an unnamed source saying that Woods does want to return to professional play when he's able.