GPS Reviews

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Garmin Nuvi 3597LMTHD

The Garmin Nuvi 3597 is a fine premium GPS, but it's priced a little too high for our tastes.

TomTom Via 620

We love the Via 620's high-resolution display, but we'd argue that unless you're driving a Land Cruiser, Hummer or some other gargantuan vehicle, the 6-inch display is simply too large and a potential safety hazard.

Editors' Choice

Pioneer AVIC-FDB

Pioneer's flagship AVIC F60DAB boasts dozens of media and navigation options -- including the first aftermarket appearance of Apple CarPlay -- but most users will find a better feature-to-cost balance elsewhere in the brand's lineup.

Garmin Nuvi 3760

Thin, light and clad in metal and glass, the Nuvi 3760 is the first portable nav device that's tugged on our heart as well as our mind. If you can, make the financial stretch to the 3790T as that model offers a brilliant voice recognition system.

Pioneer AVIC-HD3

Pioneer, late to the Aussie GPS market, is hoping to make a splash in the top end of the market with the AVIC-HD3 -- an integrated double-DIN, GPS, music, video and communications unit.

Mio DigiWalker C310

As an entry level machine, the Mio C310 works well and comes packaged with all the accessories you need, but be sure to practice on known routes until you get the hang of how to program where you want to go.

TomTom XXL 540

The extra X in the XXL 540 is there to denote the unit's large 5-inch touchscreen and if you're into size this GPS is definitely worth a look, just don't expect much sizzle.

Navman MY80

Featuring a 4.7-inch resistive touchscreen, the MY80T features traffic messaging, safety camera and school zone alerts, and maps for both Australia and New Zealand.

Garmin nüvi 1450T

Impressively thin, the Garmin Nuvi 1450T doesn't do much that excites us, but it's a solid and easy-to-use GPS with a huge 5-inch screen.

Navman iCN 520

The Navman iCN 520 scores higly for ease of use and the power of its features, but falls down on getting an initial GPS fix on your location.

Garmin Nuvi 2589 LMT

Garmin's updated premium Nuvi GPS keeps things simple, and that's a big plus, but its lack of real headline features only makes it a middle ground option for a GPS in 2014.

TomTom Go 60

Given that the GO 60 sells for exactly the same price as the much nicer GO 500, there really isn't much of a reason to consider TomTom's 'budget' GPS in this size. If you need the larger display, spend up a bit for the GO 600 instead.

TomTom XL 250

Take one XL 340, bung in the simplified interface from the entry-level Start and, voila, the slightly cheaper XL 250. Nice, but in no way revolutionary.

TomTom Via 160

TomTom's new mid-range Via comes standard with a brushed metal finish, Bluetooth hands-free, safety camera locations and voice control.

Mio DigiWalker C520

Bluetooth, text-to-speech, massive screen and good looks make the C520 a good GPS. Its great price transforms it into a great GPS.

Garmin Nuvi 52

The Garmin Nuvi 52 covers the navigation basics well in a stylish form factor, but it sits uncomfortably between genuine budget and premium devices.

TomTom Go 1000

The Go 1000's story is one of potential unfulfilled. It may be a winner after a patch or two and when the PC software's been made to work as it should, but until then it's hard to recommend.

Navman Mivue Drive LM

Premium GPS devices have to try harder than ever to stay relevant in the smartphone age. By marrying a crash camera into its hero GPS, Navman's made that effort, producing a device that serious drivers will get exceptional value from.