LG Infinia 50PX950

Here's our weekly roundup of the new products CNET reviewers liked best.

LG Infinia 50PX950

Editors' rating: 4 out of 5

The good: Produces relatively deep black levels; accurate color overall; correctly handles 1080p/24 sources; solid 3D performance; plenty of streaming and interactive features; extensive picture controls; sleek styling with single-plane design and 2-inch-deep panel; Magic Wand remote works well.

The bad: Lighter black levels than some flagship plasma TVs; blue oversaturated slightly; ineffective 2D-to-3D conversion; fewer apps and services than many other interactive models have; exhibits some temporary image retention; inefficient power use; Magic Wand remote feels like a gimmick.

The bottom line: With excellent performance showing either 2D or 3D material, the LG PX950 series stands among the best plasma TVs this year.

Read CNET's full review
Prices start at $1,399

Photo by: CBS Interactive

Nikon D7000 dSLR camera

Nikon D7000

Editors' rating: 4 out of 5

The good: Excellent performance for its class; great viewfinder; control locations and operations streamlined over previous Nikon dSLRs; double SDXC-compatible card slots.

The bad: No 1080/30p video.

The bottom line: An excellent dSLR for experienced shooters or Nikon professionals looking for a relatively cheap option, the Nikon D7000 delivers on almost all counts, including the company's best shooting design to date.

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Prices start at $1,199.95

Photo by: CBS Interactive

Samsung QX410-J01 laptop

Samsung QX410-J01 laptop

Editors' rating: 4 out of 5

The good: High-end look and feel; good keyboard; large touch pad; Intel Wireless Display, Nvidia Optimus graphics switching; very affordable for the features.

The bad: Mediocre battery life; no Bluetooth; entry-level Nvidia GeForce graphics.

The bottom line: Slickly designed and amply featured, the Samsung QX410 looks and plays the part of a more expensive high-end laptop at a price that's a solid value.

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Prices start at $829.99

Photo by: CBS Interactive

TomTom GO 2405 TM

TomTom GO 2405 TM

Editors' rating: 4 out of 5

The good: The TomTom Go's glass capacitive touch screen is super-responsive and does a good job of showing off the updated interface's crisp graphics. TomTom's menu structure receives a major overhaul and is now much easier to use. Bluetooth hands-free calling, free traffic and map updates, and voice command for control and address entry round out a strong feature set.

The bad: The voice command system doesn't feature onscreen prompts or much spoken guidance, leaving users to check the manual to learn what commands are available. While much easier to use, TomTom's interface can still be a bit confusing and overwhelming as new users learn their way around.

The bottom line: The new Go 2405 TM and 2505 TM are among the best GPS devices that TomTom has ever made, packing loads of useful features into a handsome chassis for a pretty good price.

Read CNET's full review
Prices start at $299.95

See also the TomTom GO 2505 TM, which is a similar device but has a 5-inch display.

Photo by: CBS Interactive

2011 Jaguar XK Convertible

2011 Jaguar XK Convertible

Editors' rating: 3.5 out of 5

The good: With a stunning body design and a pleasing growl from the direct injection engine, the 2011 Jaguar XK Convertible is an attention-getter. The Bowers and Wilkins audio system produces an excellent soundtrack while driving.

The bad: Sight lines are terrible in the XK Convertible with the top up, and the trunk space is compromised with the top down. The navigation system lacks advanced features, and the onscreen interface is poorly designed.

The bottom line: A beautiful-looking and excellent driving car, the 2011 Jaguar XK Convertible suffers from a feature-poor navigation system and cabin tech interface that fall short of its luxury price and competition.

Read CNET's full review
Prices start at $89,000

Photo by: CBS Interactive

LG Quantum (AT&T)

LG Quantum (AT&T)

Editors' rating: 3.5 out of 5

The good: The LG Quantum features a spacious full QWERTY keyboard and solid hardware. LG throws in 10 free apps. The Windows Phone 7 device has full wireless options and DLNA support, as well as a 5-megapixel camera with HD video capture.

The bad: The Quantum is heavy. The screen is on the smaller side, and Windows Phone 7 has limited landscape support. No expandable memory.

The bottom line: Some design issues aside, the LG Quantum is a solid Windows Phone device with a spacious QWERTY keyboard for messaging fanatics.

Read CNET's full review
Prices vary and depend on contract

Photo by: CBS Interactive

LG Vortex - black (Verizon Wireless)

LG Vortex (Verizon Wireless)

Editors' rating: 3.5 out of 5

The good: The LG Vortex has a slim and simple design with a good touch-screen display. Features include GPS, EV-DO Rev. A, Wi-Fi with 3G Mobile Hotspot capabilities, a 3.2-megapixel camera, and stereo Bluetooth, and it ships with Android 2.2.

The bad: The LG Vortex isn't as fast as higher-end smartphones, and the camera has neither LED flash nor HD video capture. The browser doesn't support Flash video. It comes with Bing search and Bing maps instead of Google's own services. The price is not as competitive as other comparable handsets. You can't uninstall preloaded apps and services.

The bottom line: The LG Vortex is a wonderful entry-level Android smartphone for Verizon Wireless, as long as you know its limitations.

Read CNET's full review
Prices vary and depend on contract

Photo by: CBS Interactive

Monster Beats by Dr. Dre Beatbox iPod Dock

Monster Beats by Dr. Dre Beatbox iPod Dock

Editors' rating: 3.5 out of 5

The good: Compact iPod/iPhone stereo system that delivers big sound; able to fill large rooms; edgy industrial design with minimalist styling; solid construction; big bass; convenient carrying handle.

The bad: No extra features; bass will rattle nearby objects; fairly pricey; wireless module is an optional accessory (with no specific price or due date); no battery option.

The bottom line: The Monster Beatbox may not deliver the most refined sonics, but if you're looking for big, aggressive sound from a small box, this is the one you want.

Read CNET's full review
Prices start at $399.95

Photo by: CBS Interactive

Motorola Bravo (AT&T)

Motorola Bravo (AT&T)

Editors' rating: 3.5 out of 5

The good: The Motorola Bravo has a nice 3.7 inch WVGA display, a slim build, and a multimedia-friendly feature set that includes DLNA support. It has good call quality as well.

The bad: The Motorola Bravo ships with a MotoBlur overlay, which may not be for everyone. The microSD card slot is located behind the battery. You can't uninstall or remove preloaded apps.

The bottom line: The Motorola Bravo is a midrange Android smartphone with solid multimedia features.

Read CNET's full review
Prices vary and depend on contract

Photo by: CBS Interactive

Motorola Citrus (Verizon Wireless)

Motorola Citrus (Verizon Wireless)

Editors' rating: 3.5 out of 5

The good: The Motorola Citrus has a simple design and a functional feature set that includes a file manager. Call quality is quite good.

The bad: The Motorola Citrus forces you to use Bing for search and maps. The Web browser experience isn't great, and typing can be tedious on the small display.

The bottom line: The Motorola Citrus is small and devoid of high-end features, but it works as a beginner Android phone.

Read CNET's full review
Prices vary and depend on contract

Photo by: CBS Interactive

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