HTC Droid Incredible (Verizon Wireless)

Here's our weekly roundup of the new products CNET reviewers liked best.

HTC Droid Incredible (Verizon Wireless)

Editors' rating: 4 out of 5

The good: The HTC Droid Incredible is blazingly fast, thanks to Verizon's 3G network. HTC Sense enhances the features of Android 2.1, and the smartphone features an 8-megapixel camera and 8GB of internal memory. Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, GPS, and 3G are all onboard.

The bad: You can't use voice and data at the same time. The multimedia experience is adequate but still behind the competition.

The bottom line: With its polished design and user interface and blazing fast speeds, the HTC Droid Incredible takes pole position as Verizon's top smartphone and is now the Android device to beat.

Read CNET's full review
Price: $199.99 with two-year contract

Photo by: CBS Interactive

2010 Nissan GT-R

2010 Nissan GT-R

Editors' rating: 4 out of 5

The good: High-tech gear, such as an active suspension, all-wheel-drive, and a dual-clutch transmission, give the 2010 Nissan GT-R race car handling. The hard-drive-based navigation system avoids traffic, and the driver can customize gauge screens with a variety of information.

The bad: The ride and noise level are harsh, fuel economy is poor, and there is no iPod support, but the 2011 model promises to address these issues.

The bottom line: The 2010 Nissan GT-R is an outstanding car for the track or sport driving, but its rough ride makes it tough to live with on a daily basis, and the next model year should see significant improvements.

Read CNET's full review
Price: $84,060

Photo by: CBS Interactive

eMachines ET1831-07

eMachines ET1831-07

Editors' rating: 3.5 out of 5

The good: Strong features for a low price; on certain tests, outperforms desktops that cost $125 more; room to expand inside; power-efficient.

The bad: Gaudy green-lit plastic strip on the front of the case; poor video playback performance.

The bottom line: The eMachines ET1831-07 isn't much of a video playback device, but in all other respects, this is a solid budget PC. Perhaps the best deal going for its features, it also outperforms other desktops in and above its price range on general computing tasks. We recommend this system to anyone shopping for a low-cost computer.

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Price: $389

Photo by: CBS Interactive

Flip SlideHD

Flip SlideHD (4 hours)

Editors' rating: 3.5 out of 5

The good: Simple recording controls; 3-inch LCD; 16GB of storage; integrated FlipShare software remains excellent.

The bad: No memory expansion; no HDMI cable included; finicky touch-screen controls; pricey.

The bottom line: The Flip Video SlideHD is a tough sell unless you really want a larger screen for viewing and sharing videos on the go.

Read CNET's full review
Price range: $264.95 - $279.39

Photo by: CBS Interactive

LG LHB535

LG LHB535

Editors' rating: 3.5 out of 5

The good: 5.1 surround sound system with built-in Blu-ray player; two HDMI inputs; Netflix, Vudu, YouTube, Pandora, and CinemaNow streaming; built-in Wi-Fi; plays music, videos, and pictures off a connected USB drive or via network; built-in iPod dock.

The bad: Sound falls a bit flat; better audio for music than movies; no automatic speaker calibration; no direct input buttons; doesn't support 3D Blu-ray.

The bottom line: The LG LHB535 offers an outstanding feature set for its price, but its sound quality is only passable.

Read CNET's full review
Price range: $445.87 - $499.00

Photo by: CBS Interactive

LG Lyric MT375 (MetroPCS)

LG Lyric MT375 (MetroPCS)

Editors' rating: 3.5 out of 5

The good: The LG Lyric has a user-friendly design, functional features, and satisfying performance.

The bad: The LG Lyric has a 2.5mm headset jack, and its camera lacks a flash. Speakerphone calls had a bit of distortion.

The bottom line: The LG Lyric offers MetroPCS customers a solid and easy-to-use phone for making calls. We appreciate the extra features as well.

Read CNET's full review
Price: $139

Photo by: CBS Interactive

Logitech Harmony 300

Logitech Harmony 300

Editors' rating: 3.5 out of 5

The good: Solid universal remote with good ergonomics; updated wizard-style setup software is optimized for tech novices and works on Windows or Mac PCs; ultra-affordable price tag.

The bad: The Harmony 300 only controls four devices and requires a computer with Internet access to configure. For just $30 more, the step-up model adds an LCD screen and uses the activity-based commands that Harmony is known for.

The bottom line: If you're looking for a cheap and easy universal remote--and you can live with its streamlined feature set--the Logitech Harmony 300 is a great choice.

Read CNET's full review
Price range: $40.41 - $49.99

Photo by: CBS Interactive

Magellan eXplorist GC

Magellan eXplorist GC

Editors' rating: 3.5 out of 5

The good: The eXplorist GC is a rugged little GPS device that is IPX-7 waterproof. The device is ready to go out of the box, with preloaded geocaches and included batteries. All relevant information about a geocache can be accessed from the eXplorist's well-organized menu. The color screen has a huge viewing angle and doesn't fade in direct sunlight.

The bad: The device could really benefit from a touch screen. The lack of an internal compass means that heading can only be tracked based on movement.

The bottom line: The Magellan eXplorist GC sits at a price and feature sweet spot that makes it a great entry point into the world of geocaching for the urban outdoorsman.

Read CNET's full review
Price: $199

Photo by: CBS Interactive

Samsung NX10

Samsung NX10

Editors' rating: 3.5 out of 5

The good: Comfortable, intelligent design; nice LCD; capable of producing excellent images.

The bad: Default image settings could be better; sensor cleaning on resume from standby; middling EVF; no override for EVF eye sensor; annoying raw software.

The bottom line: While there are enough drawbacks to keep the Samsung NX10 from being a no-brainer choice among interchangeable-lens cameras, it's still a well-designed model that's fun to shoot with and capable of producing very nice photos.

Read CNET's full review
Price range: $699.00 - $699.99

Photo by: CBS Interactive

Vizio SV472XVT

Vizio SV472XVT LCD TV

Editors' rating: 3.5 out of 5

The good: Less expensive than other local dimming LED-based LCDs; reproduces relatively deep black levels; excellent bright-room performance; controls blooming well; solid uniformity; black areas have neutral color; superb streaming and widget content via well-integrated Apps platform; includes unique Bluetooth remote with slide-out QWERTY keyboard; integrated Wi-Fi.

The bad: Uneven grayscale leads to less accurate color; backlight fluctuates with program content; couldn't handle 1080p/24 content properly; poor off-angle viewing; fewer picture controls than some high-end HDTVs; less impressive Wi-Fi performance; chunky external styling.

The bottom line: The Vizio 2XVT series offers the best Internet experience we've tested and very good image quality, all for a price that makes other high-end HDTVs seem expensive.

Read CNET's full review
Price range: $1,466.97 - $1,549.00

Photo by: CBS Interactive

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