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Samsung Galaxy Nexus

Here's our weekly roundup of the new products CNET reviewers liked best.

Samsung Galaxy Nexus


Editors' rating: 4.5 out of 5


The good: The Samsung Galaxy Nexus marries the power of the Android Ice Cream Sandwich OS with the speed of Verizon's LTE network. The phone's beautiful screen and internal performance are top-notch.


The bad: The Galaxy Nexus lacks a slot for expandable memory, and the 5-megapixel camera isn't Samsung's best. There's no support for Google Wallet, and several Ice Cream Sandwich features take some getting used to.


The bottom line: As the first U.S. phone with Ice Cream Sandwich, Verizon's Samsung Galaxy Nexus takes a coveted, solitary step forward. However, once other premium handsets receive the updated Android OS, the Galaxy Nexus will lose some of its competitive edge.


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Starting at: $649.99

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Photo by: James Martin/CNET

LBT PocketFinder personal GPS locator

LBT PocketFinder personal GPS locator


Editors' rating: 3.5 out of 5


The good: The LBT PocketFinder is extremely easy to use, requiring little to no interaction by the wearer. The included gel cases and clip are attractive without drawing attention to the device's purpose. Web and iOS apps give users access to up to 60 days of location history and unlimited location requests.


The bad: Annual operating costs are higher than those of competing devices.


The bottom line: The PocketFinder is the simplest to use of the personal GPS locators that we've tested, requiring no interaction from the user on a day-to-day basis, but you'll pay a bit more in the long run for that.


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Starting at: $149.95

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Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET

2012 Toyota Prius v

2012 Toyota Prius v


Editors' rating: 3.5 out of 5


The good: With its hybrid drive system, the 2012 Toyota Prius v averages better than 40 mpg. Entune gives it useful app integration, with Pandora, OpenTable, and others.


The bad: The drivetrain makes a tortured sound under heavy acceleration. The iPod integration did not work reliably with anything older than an iPhone 4.


The bottom line: Excellent fuel economy and a large, airy cabin make the 2012 Toyota Prius v a very practical choice for families, and new electronics give it a modern tech edge.


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Starting at: $29,990

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Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET

Monster Miles Davis Trumpet High Performance In-Ear Headphones with ControlTalk

Monster Miles Davis Trumpet High Performance In-Ear Headphones with ControlTalk


Editors' rating: 3.5 out of 5


The good: Monster's Miles Davis Trumpet earphones sound excellent, with very detailed sound and good, tight bass. They have an integrated microphone and navigation controls for cell-phone use, an eye-catching trumpet-themed design, and a tangle-resistant flat cord. The earphones also ship in a special "tribute" box that includes a carrying case and special edition of Davis' "Sketches of Spain" CD.


The bad: They're pricey at $300, and some may find their metal, trumpetlike design a tad uncomfortable.


The bottom line: While their design isn't for everybody, the Miles Davis Trumpet earphones sound really good.


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Starting at: $299.98

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Fujifilm FinePix X10

Fujifilm FinePix X10


Editors' rating: 3.5 out of 5


The good: With a nice, fast lens, attractive retro design, and speedy performance, the Fujifilm FinePix X10 hits a lot of important high notes.


The bad: The camera has some image-quality-related weaknesses, not the least of which is that to get the best photos you have to shoot in auto at reduced resolutions.


The bottom line: There's a lot to like about the Fujifilm FinePix X10, but advanced shooters may be frustrated by the trade-offs for the best photos, especially since it's more expensive than its competitors.


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Starting at: $599

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Photo by: Sarah Tew/CNET

Shure SRH550DJ Professional Quality DJ Headphones

Shure SRH550DJ Professional Quality DJ Headphones


Editors' rating: 3.5 out of 5


The good: The Shure SRH550DJ Professional Quality DJ Headphones achieve optimum comfort thanks to flexible, rotating earcups that conform to your head, and the rumbling bass is ideal for DJs and fans of music that emphasizes the low end.


The bad: The plastic housing lining the joints on the headband is prone to creaks and could degrade after prolonged use.


The bottom line: The Shure SRH550DJ headphones strike a solid balance of durability and respectable sound definition, worthy of hard-hitting DJs who play pop, rock, hip-hop, and electronic music.


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Starting at: $98.00

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Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET

Sony Ericsson Xperia Arc S

Sony Ericsson Xperia Arc S


Editors' rating: 3.5 out of 5


The good: The Sony Xperia Arc S flaunts a slim, attractive design, comes in multiple colors, runs Android 2.3 Gingerbread, boasts a powerful camera, and records 720p HD video.


The bad: Many of the phone's buttons are tiny and hard to press, plus its unlocked sticker price is pretty steep, especially for a single-core handset that lacks Ice Cream Sandwich.


The bottom line: Sony Ericsson follows up its ultrastylish Xperia Arc with the Xperia Arc S, a slightly faster version of the posh European model that runs Android 2.3 Gingerbread and rocks a powerful camera. Its high price, single-core CPU, and slow data speeds will leave Android experts wanting more.


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Pricing not yet available

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Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET

HP Omni 220-1080qd

HP Omni 220-1080qd


Editors' rating: 3.5 out of 5


The good: The HP Omni 220 1080QD offers some of the best performance available in a sub-$1,000 all-in-one desktop.


The bad: I always cringe when an all-in-one, particularly with a 23-inch display, lacks an HDMI input.


The bottom line: HP's nontouch Omni 220 1080QD all-in-one boasts a strong, performance-oriented configuration that will satisfy anyone looking for a mainstream desktop.


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Starting at: $949.99

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Photo by: Sarah Tew/CNET

Vizio Razor M3D550SR

Vizio Razor M3D550SR


Editors' rating: 3.5 out of 5


The good: The Vizio M3D550SR's black levels are very good for an edge-lit LED-based LCD TV. Shadow detail and colors are solid, while the matte screen really helps reduce reflections. The TV piles on the features with passive 3D, a Bluetooth QWERTY remote and onboard wireless. The passive system created minimal crosstalk, and Vizio includes four pairs of passive 3D glasses.


The bad: The Vizio's local dimming can cause blooming and turn completely off during fades to black. The colors were less accurate in darker areas, the screen lost uniformity at the corners, and it didn't handle 1080p/24 sources correctly. The 3D performance introduced too much depth.


The bottom line: The Vizio M3D550SR is a solid edge-lit LED TV with excellent black levels, although its passive 3D and "smart dimming" pose some issues.


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Pricing not yet available

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Photo by: Sarah Tew/CNET

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