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Toronto-based start-up Sulon is setting its sights high with its Q headset.

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Sulon says the Q will manage to offer entirely self contained AR and VR: no wires, no tethers, no controllers, no PC, no phone.

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The high-res display is a 2,560x1,440-pixel OLED screen.

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Processing and graphics are provided by an AMD FX-8800P chipset, making this essentially a wearable AMD-powered Windows PC.

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Yes, a Window PC -- the Sulon has Windows 10 pre-loaded.

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It also has a proprietary Sulon "spatial processing unit" or SPU, which maps you and the external world.

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Its augmented reality features work by the device using a "dynamic, real-time virtualisation which dynamically reconstructs and displays a virtual version of the real world to the user and to applications".

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Basically, it replicates the real world and layers the augmented parts over it.

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This means your lounge room could be your PC desktop, with you placing programs around the room.

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Or it could be a lot more exciting than that. We hope.

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It's all very ambitious, which makes us a little cautious about all the claims.

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At least until we get to try it later this week at the Game Developers Conference in San Francisco.

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The Sulon team say the Q will have "console-quality" graphics.

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Which seems a little underpowered for what the Sulon Q is claiming to be able to do.

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