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The Shell Eco-marathon took place at the Changi Exhibition Center in Singapore, and the weather was sunny and terribly hot. 

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The cars go round the track really slowly, using a method called "coast and burn" to save on fuel. 

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Overtaking on the track can be done either on the left or the right, but you'll have to blast your horn to do so. 

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It's quite the tight fit for most, so some teams use female drivers (though we can't confirm if the person driving in this one is female).

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If you're wondering just how small the cars are, here's another look.

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The Eco-marathon is all about fuel efficiency, so it's no surprise that the race is mostly quiet until the engine turns on for a brief burst of speed. 

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This Shell Prototype is a reference car that requires the driver to be lying down. 

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You'll have to lie down to fit.

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You'll have to squeeze your legs all the way in, so if you're of a bigger size, this will be difficult. 

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The engine's from a motorcycle, and each vehicle is loaded with a tiny amount of fuel -- around 20ml. 

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When fully closed, the Prototype aims to be as aerodynamic as possible. 

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The UrbanConcept wouldn't feel out of place next to a normal car, but it will be a lot smaller. 

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The inside of the Shell UrbanConcept reference resembles a normal car.

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The Nanyang Technological University's 3D printed car uses hydrogen as fuel.

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To cut down on weight, the insides of the car uses a honeycomb structure for strength. 

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Here's another UrbanConcept car that looks quite different from Shell's reference car. 

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Teams getting ready to head out to the track with their cars.

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