CNET también está disponible en español.

Ir a español

Don't show this again

With only 400,000 units available on launch day (and fewer than 2 million total due by year's end), getting your hands on one of these boxes is going to be the hardest gig in town.

Updated:Caption:CNET Reviews staffPhoto:Sarah Tew, CNET Networks
1
of 16

Unlike all the wires and external power supplies you'll find on the Xbox 360 and the Nintendo Wii, the PS3 is about as minimalist as they come.

Updated:Caption:CNET Reviews staffPhoto:Sarah Tew, CNET Networks
2
of 16

Despite the early "Foreman Grill" digs at its curved appearance, it's hard to deny that Sony's designers did a great job.

Updated:Caption:CNET Reviews staffPhoto:Sarah Tew, CNET Networks
3
of 16

The PS3's back panel is pretty clean. Note that vents are everywhere to keep the console from overheating.

Updated:Caption:CNET Reviews staffPhoto:Sarah Tew, CNET Networks
4
of 16

The 60GB version of the PS3 includes built-in flash media readers for CompactFlash, SD, and Memory Stick cards.

Updated:Caption:CNET Reviews staffPhoto:Sarah Tew, CNET Networks
5
of 16

The 60GB PS3 also includes built-in Wi-Fi networking (as indicated by that "wireless" icon in the photo's center), so you can get online without needing to run any Ethernet cables.

Updated:Caption:CNET Reviews staffPhoto:Sarah Tew, CNET Networks
6
of 16

The four USB ports on the PS3's front side let you recharge the wireless controllers and connect other peripherals, such as the EyeToy video camera.

Updated:Caption:CNET Reviews staffPhoto:Sarah Tew, CNET Networks
7
of 16

The eject and power "buttons" are touch sensitive. Games, Blu-ray and DVD movies, and CDs are inserted via the slot-loading drive.

Updated:Caption:CNET Reviews staffPhoto:Sarah Tew, CNET Networks
8
of 16

More than just a game console, the gaggle of logos along the PlayStation 3's side--Blu-ray, DVD video, SACD, CD, Dolby TrueHD, Dolby Digital, DTS, Bluetooth, and HDMI--are a testament to the device's enormous versatility.

Updated:Caption:CNET Reviews staffPhoto:Sarah Tew, CNET Networks
9
of 16

The rear panel boasts ports for HDMI, Ethernet, S/PDIF optical, and PlayStation A/V adapter connections.

Updated:Caption:CNET Reviews staffPhoto:Sarah Tew, CNET Networks
10
of 16

While it looks identical to the PS2's controller, the PS3's so-called SixAxis controller has a few secrets: it's wireless, and it has some motion-sensing capabilities and a built-in rechargeable battery. But rumble support is a thing of the past.

Updated:Caption:CNET Reviews staffPhoto:Sarah Tew, CNET Networks
11
of 16

The system supports up to seven wireless controllers, but you'll need to recharge them with the included USB cable.

Updated:Caption:CNET Reviews staffPhoto:Sarah Tew, CNET Networks
12
of 16

The included cables (left to right) are: Ethernet (if you don't want to take advantage of the wireless networking), a standard power cord, a standard USB cable (for recharging the controller), and a composite A/V adapter. It's up to you to supply an HDMI cable.

Updated:Caption:CNET Reviews staffPhoto:Sarah Tew, CNET Networks
13
of 16

Just so you don't forget that the PS3 also doubles as a full-service HD movie player, Sony is including the Blu-ray version of Talladega Nights with the first batch of consoles that ship.

Updated:Caption:CNET Reviews staffPhoto:Sarah Tew, CNET Networks
14
of 16

Both Resistance: Fall of Man and Genji: Days of the Blade are PS3 exclusives. But will they be good enough to make gamers to seek out the PS3 versus the Wii and Xbox 360?

Updated:Caption:CNET Reviews staffPhoto:Sarah Tew, CNET Networks
15
of 16

Pick your poison: the Xbox 360 ($300 to $400), the Nintendo Wii ($250), or the Sony PlayStation 3 ($500 to $600).

Updated:Caption:CNET Reviews staffPhoto:Sarah Tew, CNET Networks
16
of 16
Up Next

The coolest Fortnite merch you can buy