CNET también está disponible en español.

Ir a español

Don't show this again

Christmas Gift Guide
I figured I'd mount volume controls to the side of the case and wire playback controls to the ancient original keypad.
Caption by / Photo by Donald Bell / CNET Networks
The PIC18F45j10 microchip is a PIC microcontroller that does a lot of the dirty work on the Daisy.
Caption by / Photo by Donald Bell / CNET Networks
It looks ridiculous, I know, but the sound quality is stunning. Plus, you can hear the love that went into this thing. I wired the keypad so that buttons 4, 5, and 6 control rewind, play/pause, and fast-forward, respectively.
Caption by / Photo by Donald Bell / CNET Networks
First step (and the hardest) was surface mounting the small VS1011 chip in the top left corner. The VS1011 chip is an MP3 decoder, digital/analog converter, and headphone amplifier all in one little package. The tiny little pins were hard to line up straight, but it's close enough for rock 'n' roll. After that, I put down the resistors.
Caption by / Photo by Donald Bell / CNET Networks
Aside from the fact that I'll have to keep the back open, it's a perfect fit! After all that work, it's hard to describe how exciting it was to hear music come out of this thing that was just a pile of parts a few moments ago.
Caption by / Photo by Donald Bell / CNET Networks
Before getting started, I warmed up the soldering iron and laid out all the parts.
Caption by / Photo by Donald Bell / CNET Networks
Next came the headphone jack (bottom right) and the SD flash memory card slot (bottom left). The Daisy plays music formatted as either MP3 or WAV files loaded onto FAT32-formatted SD or MMC flash memory cards.
Caption by / Photo by Donald Bell / CNET Networks
An MP3 player is only as good as its enclosure. My 1978 "Little Professor" calculator game needed an upgrade, and the Daisy just barely fit.
Caption by / Photo by Donald Bell / CNET Networks
This is a shot of the board before any of the components have been soldered on. The Daisy kit was designed by a San Francisco-area group called Teuthis and marketed under the Make Magazine brand name. The board measures 3 inches square.
Caption by / Photo by Donald Bell / CNET Networks
Figuring out how to take advantage of the original Little Professor keypad was no easy feat. I used a multimeter and a lot of patience to determine how the leads worked together.
Caption by / Photo by Donald Bell / CNET Networks
Here's a shot of me pushing the PIC18F45j10 microchip into place. Hold your breath and pray you don't hear any sharp, snapping sounds.
Caption by / Photo by Donald Bell / CNET Networks
Here's a shot of the Daisy powered up and playing for the first time. The default volume is fairly restrained, though, so to get things cranked up, we'll have to wire some volume controls to the function pins on the bottom of the board.
Caption by / Photo by Donald Bell / CNET Networks
Most commercial electronics use components that are shrunk down to nanosize blobs. This is not the case for the Daisy. Everything is big and beautiful on this board.
Caption by / Photo by Donald Bell / CNET Networks
I popped in some fresh AAA batteries and connected the pack to the board.
Caption by / Photo by Donald Bell / CNET Networks
You can customize the Daisy's volume control to be just about anything you want. For the sake of space, I used some switches from my personal stash to create a unique volume control. The red button will increase or decrease volume based on whether the switch is in the up or down position.
Caption by / Photo by Donald Bell / CNET Networks
To get the battery pack to stay put, I used some industrial double-sided tape.
Caption by / Photo by Donald Bell / CNET Networks
Updated: