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Je suis Paris

On November 13, 130 people were killed in coordinated terrorist shooting and bombing attacks in Paris. Here, at a cafe and bar called Le Carillon still closed a month after the attacks, bullet holes are visible in the windows. Behind these, a poster says, "Je suis Paris," a slogan translated as "I am Paris" and an expression of solidarity with a traumatized city.

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Photo by: Stephen Shankland/CNET

Place de la République memorial

At the Place de la République, near several of the Paris attacks, people have left flowers and candles in an impromptu memorial. Here, a man adds another candle.

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Photo by: Stephen Shankland/CNET

Café Bonne Bière after terror attacks

Five were killed here in an attack at the Café Bonne Bière in Paris, but the establishment is open for business again. Here, patrons sip wine and chat in the December afternoon sun across from bouquets of flowers piled in a memorial. After the attacks, Parisians went out to cafes as a gesture of defiance.

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Photo by: Stephen Shankland/CNET

True intelligence is doing good

Spray-painted on the ground at the Place de la République is a message, "La vraie intelligence c'est faire le bien. Seul le bien vainc le mal." Translation: "True intelligence is doing good. Only good overcomes evil."

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Photo by: Stephen Shankland/CNET

Bataclan theater after terror attacks

Hardest hit in the terror attacks was the Bataclan, a theater where 89 were killed during a concert by the US band Eagles of Death Metal. The sidewalk in front of the theater is blanketed by bouquets, and hundreds more line the fence across the street along the Promenade Richard-Lenoir.

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Photo by: Stephen Shankland/CNET

Police on alert at Bataclan

A month after the terrorist attacks, the French police still maintain a presence at the Bataclan theater. Visitors to the site stream by, reading posters and tributes and leaving their own mementos. Police are visible in greater numbers at big tourist attractions like the Eiffel Tower, too, though the increase began after January's terrorist attacks on the Charlie Hebdo publication.

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Photo by: Stephen Shankland/CNET

Tossed but not sunk

The Eiffel Tower was bathed in French flag colors after the terrorist attacks of November 13. At the top of the red layer is Paris' motto for more than 600 years: "Fluctuat nec mergitur," Latin for "Tossed but not sunk."

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Photo by: Stephen Shankland/CNET

Galeries Lafayette commerce

The Galeries Lafayette department store, founded in 1912, is the heart of Paris retail, with thousands of shoppers visiting to see brands like Louis Vuitton, Prada, Chanel and Lancôme. The November terrorist attacks were traumatic for Paris, but they were only a blip for a city with so much tourism and commerce.

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Photo by: Stephen Shankland/CNET

Apple store and Paris Opera

The terrorist attacks were aimed at cafes that embody the Parisian lifestyle. But culture and commerce are closely paired in Paris, and neither has stopped after the attacks. This panoramic view shows Apple's flagship store in France across the street from the Paris Opera. In mid-December, Apple's store looked as heavily trafficked as ever, with dozens of shoppers checking out the gadgets for sale.

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Photo by: Stephen Shankland/CNET

Galeries Lafayette opulence

Each year, the Galeries Lafayette erects a massive Christmas tree display in its central atrium. Here, perfume seller Christian Dior gets the central position under the tree. The flow of shoppers -- many of them tourists from other countries -- was continuous in the department store in mid-December.

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Photo by: Stephen Shankland/CNET

Galeries Lafayette picture windows

The Galeries Lafayette builds elaborate animated displays to attract shoppers each holiday season. A month after the terror attacks, there were a couple of security guards visible nearby, but nothing else to hold back thousands of visitors checking out this year's moving robots and interactive electronic screens.

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Photo by: Stephen Shankland/CNET

Liberty in France

Since the French Revolution, the country has had a motto of "Liberté, egalité, fraternité." The words are carved into government buildings and statues, such as this one at the Place de la République. Liberty has been a bit bruised during a state of emergency declared after the Paris terror attacks, but for most people freedoms haven't been curtailed by a heightened police presence and stronger powers for investigation and detention.

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Photo by: Stephen Shankland/CNET

Paris Saint-Germain memento

People have left flowers, candles, flags and a scarf for fans of the Paris Saint-Germain soccer team as memorials at the Bataclan theater.

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Photo by: Stephen Shankland/CNET

Terrorist-attack victims

At the Carillon bar-cafe in Paris, a small memorial honors some of those killed in the terrorist attacks.

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Photo by: Stephen Shankland/CNET

Le Carillon and le Petit Cambodge

At le Carillon and le Petit Cambodge, two cafes in Paris that suffered terrorist attacks November 13, flags have been strewn from balconies to streetlights.

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Photo by: Stephen Shankland/CNET

Fixing the flag

A woman tidies up the monument to terrorist-attack victims at the Place de la République in Paris.

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Photo by: Stephen Shankland/CNET

Place de la République memorial

Thousands of bouquets, flags and candles memorialize terrorist-attack victims at the central monument at the Place de la République in Paris.

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Photo by: Stephen Shankland/CNET

Roses in a bullet hole

Roses are arranged in a bullet hole at le Carillon, a cafe attacked by terrorists in Paris.

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Photo by: Stephen Shankland/CNET

Place de la République memorial

The central monument at the Place de la République in Paris has become an informal memorial to victims of the November 13 terrorist attacks.

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Photo by: Stephen Shankland/CNET

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