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Net neutrality protest

On Thursday, people took to the streets outside Verizon stores across the country to protest FCC Chairman Ajit Pai's decision to end protections for net neutrality. Here are some of the signs we saw outside Verizon's flagship location in New York City.

From across the street the protest was lively enough to hear the chants. This protest was organized by Battle for the Net.

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Photo op

Lots of people passing by stopped to take pictures or join in a chant.

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Placards and a banner

A banner urges Congress to "#stopthefcc from killing net neutrality,"

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A net neutrality chant

For a while, people were chanting "net neutrality is freedom of speech."

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Partisan politics

While the FCC's net neutrality changes arise from a new Republican majority, this protester urges us to think beyond party lines.

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Quite a crowd

It seemed as if there almost as many signs as there were people.

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'Keep the internet fair'

At the heart of the net neutrality debate is the question of how best to keep carriers from playing favorites with internet traffic.

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Sidewalk scene

There were probably several hundred people gathered shortly after 5 p.m.

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'Don't tread on me'

The "Don't tread on me" flag has been a rallying point since the American Revolution

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'Don't throttle me'

Here's an update on the "Don't tread on me" message for the internet era.

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'Sign loading'

Critics worry that, among other things, the end of net neutrality regulations will make it easier for internet service providers to slow service to some people -- that is, throttling.

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'No thought police'

A woman expresses worry about the potential for censorship.

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An economic argument

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Eye on equality

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An appeal to capitalists

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Dollars and sense

Net neutrality supporters worry that the end of the FCC's regulations will bring new costs and fees. (The last time I checked we still don't have free municipal internet here in New York.)

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'No fair'

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Message to Joe Crowley

This sign addresses Congressman Joseph Crowley, a Democrat representing New York's 14th District, who opposes the repeal of the FCC's net neutrality rules.

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A call for Congress to act

Some people are hoping Congress will step in to stop the FCC's repeal of the rules.

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'Equal access'

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A fistful of signs

This woman brought extras.

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RIghting a wrong

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Open internet

Supporters of net neutrality often refer to the need for an open internet.

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Now's the time

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Getting colorful

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Pai face

The puns have spoken.

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'Stop internet fast lanes'

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Angry face

The angry-face emoji was all over the place at the protest.

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Payin' point

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'Save Democracy'

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'Please upgrade your plan'

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Young Democrats

The lively contingent from Stuyvesant High School brought its own flag.

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Free speech blogger

This woman's message -- in faint print at the top of the sign, it says "Free Speech Blogger" -- echoes a concern that the end of net neutrality regulations could hurt smaller alternative media outfits, which might not be able to afford potential fast-lane service to compete with corporate media.    

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Analog jam

Remember the analog era and its slow internet service?

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'Don't make us pay'

Kid, we actually do pay for internet service already -- just check your parents' monthly bill

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From Pai to pal

One can dream.

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