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London black cab driver Steve Glover, aged 50, has been driving a taxi for 17 years. He has a simple message for Uber: "All we demand is that you abide by the same rules as everyone else!"

Glover is one of many black cab drivers we spoke to who agreed to share their opinions on Uber and describe the way the company has affected London's taxi drivers.

Click through to meet more of the drivers who shared their experiences.

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"This isn't tech. This is a state-assisted takeover of a regulated trade," writes Sean Paul Day, aged 49, a driver for 18 years.

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Deep in the heart of Southwark in south London is a huge rest and meeting point for cabbies. There's parking, a parts store, a car wash and a cafe serving inexpensive comfort food.

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Housed in this static portacabin, the cafe serves as a community hub for the drivers, all of whom seemed to know each other. As we sat and talked with some cabbies, others would regularly call out as familiar faces entered the building.

The food included British classic cuisine: kippers on toast, a full English breakfast and bread and butter pudding. Coffee options included "milky" or "machine". You won't get a double-shot skinny vanilla latte here.

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"Uber had four months to fix things and Uber didn't. Not fit and proper." writes Mick Smith, aged 54, a driver for 28 years.

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This car wash was in almost constant use during the few hours we spent at the Southwark taxi station. Prices range from £5 for an outside wash, to £50 for a full inside and outside clean.

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The Southwark station contains one of London's only mechanics businesses that caters solely to black cabs.

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"I raised my game. I won't join a race to the bottom!" While he didn't praise Uber, George Shipton, 52, acknowledged that the company's arrival in London had forced him to diversify, for the better. 

A driver for 14 years, Shipton emblazons his taxi with advertising for luxury brands, and he operates a historical tour service for London visitors. 

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"Uber needs regulations to protect women," says Sasha Simmons, 49, commenting on the accusations of sexual assault by Uber drivers in London, and the various convictions.

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Two taxi drivers take a moment to relax and watch their cars being serviced in the Southwark cab station. The man on the right (who requested not to be named) was waiting to have his payment machines removed, having just finished his last ever trip after 48 years of driving. 

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George Vyse, 78, has been driving for 47 years, but more recently has become known as an activist in the black cab driver community. He's represented various drivers during disputes with Transport for London (the capital's transport body that licenses both black cabs and Uber).

He's pictured here in his office that's next to the cafe. From here, George buys and sells black cabs. "Uber is a monster that's got out of control and TFL are clueless," reads his sign.

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A sign in George Vyse's office window shows Calvin from the cartoon series "Calvin and Hobbes" urinating on the Uber logo.

We had no doubts about George's feelings toward Uber, even before we spoke.

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"Uber: Obey the regulations like everyone else!!!" states Jim Hourihan, 51, a driver for 2 years.

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"Since Uber I'm having to work longer hours, see less of family and earn less money." Tony Cable, 49, talked about how Uber has affected some drivers' personal lives. Cable has been driving for 26 years.

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"Uber: Pay your taxes and VAT. Sorry is not good enough for all the sexual assaults." Chris McCarthy, 67, has driven for 20 years.

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"Uber: Money can't buy principles ... or The Knowledge." says Steve "Chesterfield" Painter, 61, who's been driving for 32 years.

First initiated in 1865, The Knowledge is a notoriously difficult exam all London black cab drivers must pass to obtain a license to operate in the city. The test requires them to memorise 25,000 roads and all landmarks in London, allowing them to navigate the city efficiently without using maps. It can take two to four years to pass this step.

Uber drivers are not required to obtain The Knowledge, but they must pass an exam on map-reading skills.

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"Uber the epitome of everything that has been ripped from the working class, from five years of Tory corruption -- it took us 100 years to build." Lenny Etheridge, 60, a driver for 31 years.

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On the Southwark taxi station noticeboard, a cardboard sign advertises a black cab for sale.

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This "cabmen's shelter" is one of 13 such structures remaining in London. All are "Grade II listed", meaning they're protected by law from being altered or demolished. 

The first shelters were set up in 1875 and were designed as drive-through conveniences. It used to be illegal for the drivers to leave their vehicles, so these road-side refreshment stands became crucial.

Built in 1901, this shelter originally provided refreshments to cabbies in Leicester square. It was moved to its present location on Russell Square in the 1980s.

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A classic London black cab sits in a parking bay in Russell Square, Central London. A double-decker bus passes behind.

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