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Samsung's large scale battery testing facility in Gumi, South Korea. As part of a new eight-point safety check, Samsung will implement more frequent battery testing, including overcharging tests, nail puncture tests, and extreme temperature stress testing.

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Running battery tests that examine the impact of wireless charging on the Note 7.

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Testing USB-C battery charging inside Samsung's labs.

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In addition to hardware battery tests, the rigorous process looked at the role software algorithms played as well.

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More software algorithm testing as Samsung undertakes a comprehensive review of its troubled batteries.

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As part of the eight-point battery safety check, a Note 7 undergoes a durability test.

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A battery penetration test in Samsung's labs as part of the company's durability inspection.

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Compression testing on Samsung's batteries as part of a widespread review of the battery's durability.

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A battery life cycle test which is part of Samsung's eight-point battery safety check.

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A visual inspection of Samsung's batteries to check for flaws.

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An X-Ray machine looks inside Samsung's batteries, checking for any abnormalities as part of the eight point safety check.

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The TVOC testing ensures there isn't any possibility of leakage of the battery component.

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Breaking down a battery to take a look at every component is now part of Samsung's battery safety process. This process assesses its overall quality, including the battery tab welding and conditions of insulation tape.

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OCV testing, seen here, checks for any change in voltage throughout the manufacturing process from component level to complete device.

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Samsung discovered the two different batteries provided by its two different suppliers both had problems.

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Samsung explained the issues by showing what a lithium-ion battery looks like internally.

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Samsung discovered some design flaws with Battery A, a battery from the supplier that led to the Note 7's first recall.

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Battery B had some manufacturing issues. When the supplier increased its production to meet Samsung's demand, it introduced some errors into the process that caused the battery to short circuit.

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