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Christmas Gift Guide

A house for millenials

Who's at the door?

It's all app-ening

Come on in

Call you out

Tiny spaces

More tiny spaces

Leak detection

Call a plumber

Voice control

Light it up

Study space

Color me pink (or purple)

Audio analytics

Bye for now

Intel's tiny house is just 210 square feet, representing the micro-spaces that millenials and city-dwellers are now calling home. The house showcases how smart-home devices can work together and be controlled through one simple interface. The house is currently located in San Francisco, but can travel around and will be used as a testing lab for new technologies over the next 12 to 18 months.

Caption by / Photo by Lexy Savvides/CNET

Intel's True Key technology powers a demo at the front door. The smart lock opens when the camera (hidden in the bird box) recognizes a trusted face at the door.

Caption by / Photo by Lexy Savvides/CNET

Intel is not building the devices themselves, but the framework called the Smart Home Development Acceleration Platform so all these devices can be controlled through one app.

Here, you can see the camera has recognized a face.

Caption by / Photo by Lexy Savvides/CNET

Once it finds a known face, access to the door is granted. The app can also show you the faces of unrecognized visitors.

Caption by / Photo by Lexy Savvides/CNET

If the camera detects an unfamiliar face at the door, the app will prompt you with a screen that gives you options to call an emergency number or grant them access to the property.

Caption by / Photo by Lexy Savvides/CNET

Inside the tiny house, it looks like any regular studio space, complete with kitchen and living area.

Caption by / Photo by Lexy Savvides/CNET

There's also a bathroom and a study area that conceals a bed right underneath. All the lightbulbs throughout can be controlled through the app, either through voice control or via sliders to adjust color or intensity.

Caption by / Photo by Lexy Savvides/CNET

The tiny house can also tell you when something has gone wrong. For example, this standard off-the-shelf moisture sensor can feed back information into the app when it detects a leak. It prompts the owner to take action by showing a notification on the screen and provides a list of responses such as calling a plumber.

Caption by / Photo by Lexy Savvides/CNET

Don't have a favorite plumber on speed dial? The app pulls in a list of plumbers (or other tradespeople) to help solve your issue.

Caption by / Photo by Lexy Savvides/CNET

A microphone in the house lets you control several devices with voice commands. Change the colors of the lights or turn them on and off with simple prompts.

Caption by / Photo by Lexy Savvides/CNET

Change the color of the light strip just by asking politely.

Caption by / Photo by Lexy Savvides/CNET

Although the house is small, there is still room for a tiny study area in the back corner. All the lights can be controlled through the app.

Caption by / Photo by Lexy Savvides/CNET

The app also gives granular control over light color.

Caption by / Photo by Lexy Savvides/CNET

On top of voice control, the tiny house also has an audio analytic system that can detect when something has gone awry. If the microphone hears the sound of glass breaking, it can send an alert to the app to notify you that there might be a break-in. Or, if it hears a smoke alarm going off it can tell you, wherever in the world you might be.

Caption by / Photo by Lexy Savvides/CNET

The tiny house supports what Intel calls scenes. A scene takes multiple devices and links them together to create a single action. For example, say a command when you are leaving the house. The doors will lock automatically and the lights will turn off.

Caption by / Photo by Lexy Savvides/CNET
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