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This giant dunk tank was recently set up in the middle of Times Square in New York as part of the World Science Festival. Called Holoscenes, it's part of a free performance series designed to raise awareness about science and sustainability.

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Each performer in the piece spends time inside this huge glass aquarium. Water is periodically pumped in to represent the Earth's rising sea levels.

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The big black cylinder stores water when it's not pumped into the tank. It holds 12 tons! These guys are the tech crew that help support the performance.

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The first fellow I saw perform had a guitar with him under water. Here he lets it float next to him.

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Holoscenes was created by Lars Jan and the Early Morning Opera.

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Here you can see the transition as a new performer prepares to enter the tank. Must have been quite the view from the top of the ladder!

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It was hard to tell if the people gathered around were just average tourists who found a neat thing to watch for free, or if they were actually here specifically for the performance. Whatever, they were riveted.

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Performances were running from 6-11 p.m. Two sets of lights on either side illuminate the tank as the night falls.  

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A couple hundred meters south of the tank was another installation from the World Science Festival.

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Seen in closeup, this dance floor by Energy Floors generates power from the kinetic energy of dancers' steps. 

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From 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. guests were invited to join in games, fitness and dance classes on the surface, which helped charge a battery. Afterward they were given a chance to charge their phones with the energy they had created.

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Next to the dance floor was a screen showing visitors the impact of their energy input. Pretty cool piece!

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