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The display is 5 inches, putting it right in the middle of the 4.7-inch iPhone 6 and the 5.5-inch iPhone 6 Plus.

That's a sweet spot for me, as it's big enough to display photos clearly, but isn't too cumbersome to hold.

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I like the look of the phone, but there's no escaping the fact that it's remarkably similar to the iPhone 6.

Published:Caption:Photo:Andrew Hoyle/CNET

HTC has a new addition to its top-end One series of phones, the One A9. Like the flagship One M9, the A9 has an all-metal chassis, a full HD display and an octa-core processor.

It has a different look to the M9 too and in fact Apple fans may find its aesthetic a little familiar. It'll be available globally in grey, gold, silver and red starting in November.

It will cost $399 in the US -- potentially a great bargain -- and £430 in the UK, which is the opposite of a bargain. Australian pricing has yet to be announced.

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It has a full HD (1,920x1,080-pixel) resolution -- the same size and resolution of the display on the One M9.

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HTC hasn't equipped the front with its familiar "BoomSound" speakers. Instead, there's a physical home button, which doesn't help it look any less like an iPhone.

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It's running the absolute latest version of Google's mobile operating system, Android 6.0 Marshmallow.

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There's a 13-megapixel camera mounted on the back of the phone. It sticks out from the body, with a raised metal ridge running around it -- just like the iPhone.

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With the exception of the red hue, which I rather like, the colour choices are identical to the choices for Apple's device.

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HTC has applied its Sense 7 interface over the top of Marshmallow, which brings features such as this dynamic home screen. It learns which apps you use most frequently at home or work and tries to display the tools you need most at the right time.

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You can heavily customise it too, with a wide variety of themes. They change everything from the background images to the colour schemes of menus and the app icons.

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The home button on the front doubles as a fingerprint reader. It seemed to work very well in my hands-on time.

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Despite the home key, there are still on-screen navigation buttons, meaning there are two home buttons within a few millimetres of each other.

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It's easy to set up the fingerprint scanner.

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HTC's camera app looks much the same. It's easy to use and when you go into Pro mode, you can shoot in raw.

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Raw files can be processed automatically in-phone into JPEGs. If you want to tweak highlights and colours yourself however, you'll need to drop the original raw file onto a computer.

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It has a Micro-USB port for charging, rather than the new USB Type-C.

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There's a 5-megapixel camera on the front of the phone for selfies.

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Its rounded edges are rather familiar...

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The SIM card and microSD card slots are tucked into the sides. You'll need a SIM removal tool (or a paperclip) to get them out.

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