Google Goggles is such a great name we're not surprised Google had to invent an app to go with it. The thinking behind the app is simple -- snap a photo and it searches Google for any text it can recognise, similar images and more info about the object in the photo.

We took Google Goggles for a test drive to see what it could see, and it was a mixed bag, with some searching coming up trumps and some coming up turnips. In use, it's an innovative and fun application, but it's very unreliable.

Alone against a white background, a can of delicious spray cheese was easily recognised by Google's teams of trained squirrels, and Google Goggles gave us a list of useful links to spray-cheese-related listings.

Google Goggles is free on the Android Market on phones running Android 1.6 or higher -- so not for HTC Hero fans.

Read on to find out how other photos fogged up Google Goggles.

The same can of aerosol cheese, photographed against a busier backround, didn't return any good results -- but Google did make a punt at finding similar images, returning a gallery including a lizard and a jacuzzi.
After we took a snap of this tin of Altoids, Google Goggles spends a moment analysing the image for recognisable text, shapes or colours.
Unfortunately, despite its popularity as a Web-geek tool, our search of the extra-strong mints wasn't a success.
A snapshot of a business card did a better job of recognising the contact info, but it missed most of the details, and the Web-search results were way off.
A photo of a book had vastly superior results, giving us a handy Amazon link, a Google book preview and a price-checking option.
A self-portrait revealed CNET's mobile phones reviewer looks similar to a plate of sweets, a small fox, or the Cardiff opera house. Bang on, then.

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