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Sigfox car tracker

Fire hydrant networked pressure monitor

Burglar alarm backchannel

Trash can with brains

Making dumb smoke alarms smart

Better beer through wireless networking

Connected beehive

Sigfox's low-power network can't send YouTube videos or even a long email message, but the French company has found a lot of customers who need a cheap, battery-friendly network. This GPS sensor used in antitheft systems for cars periodically reports the location of a vehicle. Sigfox showed it and several other products off at the Mobile World Congress show in Barcelona.

Caption by / Photo by Stephen Shankland/CNET

Networking smarts can help firefighters make sure there's enough water pressure to actually fight fires. This pressure-monitoring system is built by Bayard, a French company that supplies most fire hydrants in France.

Caption by / Photo by Stephen Shankland/CNET

Thieves can try to defeat burglar alarms with jamming technology that blocks them from sending warnings using conventional mobile-phone networks. This alarm from Securitas Direct uses Sigfox communications as a backup alert channel to defeat the jammer.

Caption by / Photo by Stephen Shankland/CNET

Barcelona is installing trash cans that use Sigfox's network to report when they're getting full so the city can empty them sooner -- and not have to send collectors out to trash cans that aren't full.

Caption by / Photo by Stephen Shankland/CNET

The Otio Alert listens for smoke detector or burglar alarms and sends you a text message alert. In effect, it brings computing smarts to old-style alarms using Sigfox's network.

Caption by / Photo by Stephen Shankland/CNET

Estella Damm is using Sigfox's network to monitor beer temperature at bars that may not be aware of malfunctions that could spoil the beer.

Caption by / Photo by Stephen Shankland/CNET

Hipsters and environmentally aware companies like operating beehives. This one from Optibee reports wirelessly when honeycombs are getting full so they can be emptied.

Caption by / Photo by Stephen Shankland/CNET
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