CNET también está disponible en español.

Ir a español

Don't show this again

Christmas Gift Guide

Great Balls of Fire

Rock On

Just Another Night

A Hard Rain's a-Gonna fall

Cold As Ice

Going back to the border

New Horizons

Far Above the Clouds

Big City Nights

It's a marvellous night for a moon dance

Dust in the Wind

Hot Lava

Rocky Mountain High

No Line on the Horizon

From the Clouds

Dubai State of Mind

Rock of Ages

Island in the Sun

I Wanna Rock

The sea is frozen

Islands in the Stream

Many Rivers to Cross

Somewhere in Sydney

Great Southern Land

We Will Rock You

Smoke Gets In Your Eyes

Smoke From a Distant Fire

Dry Lake Bed

For Those About To Rock

King Volcano

As International Space Station (ISS) Commander Chris Hadfield steps down, we have gathered together some of our favourite pictures that the astronaut took of our planet from space.

Although it is not safe for any one person to remain in space for too long, it's with a sad sniffle that we see Canadian-born Commander Chris Hadfield hand over his role on the ISS. The station commander rapidly became a beloved figure to us Earthbound folks, sharing freely his life aboard the station via a series of informative — and engaging — YouTube videos and Reddit Ask me Anything sessions.

We also very much enjoyed opening his Twitter feed every day, not only for regular updates on the ISS, but for the beautiful pictures he's taken of the Earth, giving us a view of geological phenomena and human habitation rarely glimpsed — as well as a small sense of a phenomenon usually only experienced by astronauts. Called the "overview effect", it is a feeling of wonder, awe and love experienced by astronauts when viewing the Earth from space.

Hadfield has already handed command over to his successor, Russian cosmonaut Pavel Vinogradov, and is due to return to Earth.

If you want to browse all of former Commander Hadfield's space photos, you can check them out on his Twitter feed and his Tumblr page. We've collected a few of our favourites in the gallery below.

The sun, seen without the filter of the Earth's atmosphere.

Caption by / Photo by Commander Chris Hadfield

The beautiful Canadian Rockies.

Caption by / Photo by Commander Chris Hadfield

The coast of Florida, US, at dawn beyond the ISS.

Caption by / Photo by Commander Chris Hadfield

A swirling storm builds just off the Irish coast.

Caption by / Photo by Commander Chris Hadfield

Seen from space, the slow crawl of glacial flow becomes more visible.

Caption by / Photo by Commander Chris Hadfield

The clear demarcation of the US-Mexico border. Mexico is on the left.

Caption by / Photo by Commander Chris Hadfield

Commander Hadfield called this: "A view to put the mind at ease."

Caption by / Photo by Commander Chris Hadfield

The south of UK.

Caption by / Photo by Commander Chris Hadfield

Cities in north-central England at night, illuminated by lights.

Caption by / Photo by Commander Chris Hadfield

The moon sets, a sight seen 16 times a day on the ISS. Somehow, it never gets old.

Caption by / Photo by Commander Chris Hadfield

The starkness of the Saudi Arabian desert.

Caption by / Photo by Commander Chris Hadfield

Long-dead volcanoes left their pocked and bubbled mark on Saudi Arabia.

Caption by / Photo by Commander Chris Hadfield

Clouds clustered around a high mountain top.

Caption by / Photo by Commander Chris Hadfield

Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic.

Caption by / Photo by Commander Chris Hadfield

Disturbances in the clouds over the Pacific ocean.

Caption by / Photo by Commander Chris Hadfield

Dubai at night, with Palm Jumeirah clearly outlined just off the coast.

Caption by / Photo by Commander Chris Hadfield

The natural Richat Structure rock formation in the Mauritanian Sahara.

Caption by / Photo by Commander Chris Hadfield

The Galapagos Islands shimmering in the sunlight.

Caption by / Photo by Commander Chris Hadfield

Sand and wind erosion expose striations in the Saharan bedrock.

Caption by / Photo by Commander Chris Hadfield

Icy swirls in the frozen seas off the northern coast of Japan.

Caption by / Photo by Commander Chris Hadfield

An atoll in the waters around Indonesia. From space, it looks a bit like a snail.

Caption by / Photo by Commander Chris Hadfield

Sunlight turning a system of rivers into what looks like liquid silver.

Caption by / Photo by Commander Chris Hadfield

Sydney and its suburbs stretching out into the night.

Caption by / Photo by Commander Chris Hadfield

The Australian outback, Commander Hadfield said, is like a series of cave paintings.

Caption by / Photo by Commander Chris Hadfield

More of the outback. This time, stone formations pushing up through the desert.

Caption by / Photo by Commander Chris Hadfield

Smoke from the 2013 January bushfires as seen from space, showing the extent of their effect on our country.

Caption by / Photo by Commander Chris Hadfield

The smoke from just one fire during the 2013 January bushfires.

Caption by / Photo by Commander Chris Hadfield

A dried-up lake in the middle of the outback, white with salt.

Caption by / Photo by Commander Chris Hadfield

Commander Hadfield said that the Australian outback "looks like somebody spilled something on it". Our money's on Pro Hart.

Caption by / Photo by Commander Chris Hadfield

The active Mount Taranaki volcano in New Zealand looks like a perfect circle.

Caption by / Photo by Commander Chris Hadfield
Updated:
Up Next
The only supermoon of 2017, as seen...
15