CNET también está disponible en español.

Ir a español

Don't show this again

For a more elegant corner kick

Dutch designer Joep Verhoeven happened to ride his bike past a gashed chain-link fence that had been hastily repaired with wire. Eureka! A company was born.

Verhoeven's Lace Fence applies the techniques of lace-making to the industrial chain-link fence, creating complex, handmade, lacy designs that are wired into machine-made fencing. The fences retain their barrier function while acquiring a hitherto unknown beauty.

The company employs a crew of 35 craftspeople in India to execute the designs, which are drawn out using basic 2D drawing software. Verhoeven says it takes the full-time crew about a month to produce 150 square meters of the lacy chain-link. Another 30 part-time workers are on call for large projects or tight deadlines.

Clients have included fashion brands like Nike and Hugo Boss, along with architects, governments and schools.

"Designs like chain-link fence that are so 'perfect' in their function that you see them all over the world have always fascinated me," Verhoeven told Crave in an e-mail. "The challenge for me as designer is to find 'space to play' within such perfectly developed 'finished' designs."

Verhoeven & Co. have found plenty of space to play, as you'll see in this slideshow.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Lace Fence
1
of 12

Lacy detail

Updated:Photo:Lace Fence
2
of 12

Windmill wearing lace

Updated:Photo:Lace Fence
3
of 12

Geodesic designs

Updated:Photo:Lace Fence
4
of 12

A unique bridge

Updated:Photo:Lace Fence
5
of 12

Panels prior to installation

Updated:Photo:Lace Fence
6
of 12

Instal(lace)tion

Updated:Photo:Lace Fence
7
of 12

High wire act

Updated:Photo:Lace Fence
8
of 12

A Dutch accent

Updated:Photo:Lace Fence
9
of 12

Tulipomania

Updated:Photo:Lace Fence
10
of 12

Modern design for Nike

Updated:Photo:Lace Fence
11
of 12

Magritte

Updated:Photo:Lace Fence
12
of 12
Up Next

41 weird objects seen on Mars, explained