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PDN PhotoPlus Expo

Peak Design

Spider Holster SpiderLight Holster

ArcaSwiss plate

Backpack clip

GoPro adapter

Fujifilm Instax Mini 70

Leica Sofort

Sound Shark

Sound Shark

Wacom MobileStudio Pro

Wacom MobileStudio Pro

Wacom MobileStudio Pro

Yuneec Typhoon H with Intel RealSense

Ikan EC-1 Gimbal

ThinkTank Shape Shifter V2

ThinkTank Shapeshifter V2

ThinkTank Shapeshifter V2

ThinkTank Airport Advantage

ThinkTank FPV Session drone bag

ThinkTank FPV Session drone bag

DxO One and accessories

Vuze 3D 360-degree camera

Ricoh Theta SC

Pentax K-70

Tamron SP 150-600mm f5-6.3 Di VC USD G2

Irix 15mm f2.4 lenses

Sigma 12-24mm F4 DG HSM Art

Sigma 85mm F1.4 DG HSM Art

Sigma 500mm F4 DG OS HSM Sport

Lensbaby Trio 28

Fotodiox Pro ND Throttle Adapter

Fotodiox Pro ND Throttle Adapter

Fotodiox Pro Nikon-to-Sony Fusion Adapter

Fotodiox Pro Nikon-to-Sony Fusion Adapter

Fotodiox Pro PopSpot

Fotodiox Pro PopSpot

Fotodiox Pro FlapJack and Wand

Fotodiox Pro LED Studios-in-a-Box

Fotodiox Pro LED Studios-in-a-Box

Foldio360 by Orangemonkie

Magmod speedlite modifiers

Lume Cube

Manfrotto Lumimuse 6

Manfrotto Twist Grip

Manfrotto Twist Grip

Joby GripTight POV Kit

Lowepro Flipside Trek

Lowepro Flipside Trek

JPEGmini Pro

Palette

Palette

Palette

Once a year, camera geeks gather in New York to check out some of the latest in gadgets and gear. Here's some of what we saw at the 2016 show.

Caption by / Photo by Joshua Goldman/CNET

Peak Design just wrapped up a very successful Kickstarter campaign for several bags made for cameras and life in general.

Caption by / Photo by Joshua Goldman/CNET

Another company that's no stranger to crowdfunding is Spider Holster. The camera accessory maker is currently on Kickstarter with the SpiderLight, a more compact version of its original Spider Holster.

Caption by / Photo by Lori Grunin/CNET

Attach the ArcaSwiss-compatible plate to your camera and use the attached pin to drop into the small, all-metal holster that clips to a belt or one of the company's camera belts.

Caption by / Photo by Lori Grunin/CNET

You can also get a mount for your bag strap that lets you just clip the SpiderLight Holster to your chest. A Velcro lens strap helps hold bigger lenses.

Caption by / Photo by Joshua Goldman/CNET

A separate clip plate will be available to use with GoPro cameras. You can check out the Kickstarter here.

Caption by / Photo by Lori Grunin/CNET

Fujifilm showed off its full line of instant Instax cameras including the Mini 70.

Caption by / Photo by Lori Grunin/CNET

Leica launched its own high-end instant camera this year, the Sofort.

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The Sound Shark is a parabolic audio collector for lapel mics.

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The company claims it's good enough to record a speaker from 6 feet away as if they were wearing a lapel mic.

Caption by / Photo by Joshua Goldman/CNET

The MobileStudio Pro is Wacom's Windows 10-powered tablet for creative professionals.

Caption by / Photo by Joshua Goldman/CNET

It's available in six configurations, four 13.3-inch and two 15.6-inch models, and use a new stylus named the Pro Pen 2, which has improved precision, less lag and 8,192 levels of sensitivity.

Caption by / Photo by Lori Grunin/CNET

They work with the old $50 (£45 and AU$50) Bluetooth-connecting Cintiq Companion keyboard, so you'll be able to get your non-artsy work done, too.

Caption by / Photo by Lori Grunin/CNET

Unlike last year, which saw about half a dozen drone makers and resellers, Yuneec was the only one at the show. All of the company's models were on display, including the Typhoon H with Intel's RealSense obstacle avoidance module.

Caption by / Photo by Joshua Goldman/CNET

Also unlike last year, the number of motorized gimbal manufacturers was pretty much non-existent. Ikan was there showing off its latest, the giant EC-1. The 3-axis gimbal features brushless motors with 360-degree movement on all axis. It supports cameras 2 to 4.5 pounds.

Caption by / Photo by Joshua Goldman/CNET

Bags are a big part of the show. ThinkTank brought three new bags including the second generation of its Shape Shifter.

Caption by / Photo by Joshua Goldman/CNET

It's designed to work with the company's modular pouches for lenses, speedlites and other gear.

Caption by / Photo by Joshua Goldman/CNET

But with your gear removed, it compresses to 3 inches in depth.

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The Airport Advantage is its new roller bag designed to fit in small commuter jets.

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ThinkTank has had a line of drone bags, but they're for aerial photography models. The FPV Session is its first made for racing drones.

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The bag is designed to hold your quads on the outside, but has plenty of space inside for your transmitter, goggles, batteries, props and other spare parts.

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The DxO One is an ultracompact camera with a 1-inch image sensor designed to work on its own or paired with an iPhone. The camera isn't new, but the company recently released some accessories to make the camera more versatile, such as this waterproof shell.

Caption by / Photo by Joshua Goldman/CNET

The Vuze first showed up at CES 2016 and now it's getting ready to start shipping. The camera features eight individual cameras that get automatically stitched together into 3D, 360-degree spherical photos and video.

Caption by / Photo by Joshua Goldman/CNET

The SC is Ricoh's latest 360-degree camera and made its public debut at the show.

Caption by / Photo by Joshua Goldman/CNET

The Pentax K-70 was also at the Ricoh booth, an affordable dSLR featuring a maximum ISO sensitivity of ISO 102400 and a hybrid AF system wrapped up in a compact, water-resistant and lightweight design.

Caption by / Photo by Joshua Goldman/CNET

The second-gen of this massive zoom lens is impressive in person and loaded with new components.

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Irix released this lens, its first, earlier this year. The company's goal is to bring together classic style and quality with new technology. The 15mm full-frame lens is available in standard and premium versions. At PhotoPlus, it also had on display upcoming 11mm f4.0 and 45mm f1.4 lenses.

Caption by / Photo by Joshua Goldman/CNET

The wide angle 12-24mm F4 DG HSM Art has all the features and build characteristics of the company's line of Art lenses; it's designed to deliver smooth, out-of-focus areas and edge-to-edge sharpness. It can focus as close as 9.4 inches (24 centimeters).

Caption by / Photo by Joshua Goldman/CNET

Portrait photographers should start saving for the 85mm F1.4 DG HSM Art as it'll set you back $1,200 (roughly £980 in the UK and AU$1,580).

Caption by / Photo by Joshua Goldman/CNET

The $6,000 (roughly £4,910, AU$7,890) 500mm F4 DG OS HSM Sport is built from magnesium alloy components, with dust-and-splashproof construction and a water- and oil-resistant front element. It has standard and panning-optimized optical stabilization, a focus memory setting and a rear slot for filters.

Caption by / Photo by Joshua Goldman/CNET

The Trio 28 consists of a single mount with three 28mm lenses that you rotate into place: a Sweet, a Velvet and a Twist.

Like their full-size counterparts, the Trio 28's Twist lens surrounds the central area with swirly bokeh, the Velvet looks soft and the Sweet renders increasing blur from the center out. On Micro Four Thirds cameras, the Trio 28 lenses have about the equivalent angle of view of a 56mm lens, while APS-C Sony E mount and Fujifilm X mount versions deliver 42mm.

Caption by / Photo by Joshua Goldman/CNET

The Fusion adapter lets you use Canon EF and EF-S lenses on a Sony E-mount camera, but can also communicate your Sony camera's electronic commands so the Canon lens behaves like a Sony lens.

Caption by / Photo by Joshua Goldman/CNET

There's also a built-in variable eight and a half stop neutral density filter in its all-metal design.

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Though the new Nikon F-mount to Sony E-mount Fusion adapter doesn't have an ND filter, it's capable of controlling a high percentage of Nikon lenses both new and old.

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Fotodiox Pro says it's a first of its kind.

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The PopSpot is a miniature LED fresnel light with big output.

Caption by / Photo by Joshua Goldman/CNET

It gets its name from its size: The light by itself is about the size of a soda can.

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Fotodiox has a whole line of slim edge-lit LED light panels called Flapjack, and its latest is this square model. Joining it is an LED wand.

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If you do a lot of product photography, one of these boxes could make your life a lot easier. They're available in four sizes and come with four colored backgrounds: Blue, gray, black and white.

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The boxes are lined with reflective material and have built-in LED lighting.

Caption by / Photo by Joshua Goldman/CNET

The Foldio360 combines Orangemonkie's compact pop-up studio box and a backlit rotating platform. Using either a phone via Bluetooth or dSLR with IR, the platform rotates and triggers the camera to continuously shoot until it creates a full set of shots to create a 360-degree image of an object.

Caption by / Photo by Joshua Goldman/CNET

What makes Magmod's light modifiers special is how you attach them to your flash. Instead of straps or Velcro, it uses strong magnets, allowing you to pop modifiers on and off quickly and quietly. Almost as important is that it will attach to just about any flash regardless of size.

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Need a powerful lighting solution that fits in your pocket? That's the Lume Cube. Though it didn't have any new products at the show, the company is about to launch a Kickstarter on October 29 for a new product, Life Lite, the details of which are still a secret.

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Manfrotto had one of the largest booths at the show, displaying all its equipment from all of its brands -- everything from bags to flashes to tripods. One of the busiest sections was its phone accessories, though, such as the Lumimuse 6, a round dimmable LED catch light for portraits with integrated color filters.

Caption by / Photo by Joshua Goldman/CNET

Also part of the collection is a the Twist Grip, a premium aluminum phone mount.

Caption by / Photo by Joshua Goldman/CNET

It gets its name from the design: The parts that grip your phone twist to a flat position so you can easily slip it in your pocket.

Caption by / Photo by Joshua Goldman/CNET

Joby's newest accessory is sort of a crossover between its phone and GoPro gear. The GripTight POV Kit holds your phone and has a tilting handle that can be used to help stabilize your videos, give you a steadier grip for photos, vertically or horizontally stand up your phone and it has a cold shoe for adding a light or mic and comes with a Bluetooth remote, too. The handle can also be removed so you can attach the phone grip to any GoPro mount.

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Lowepro has many, many camera bags, but one of its newest lines is the lightweight Flipside Trek. It's designed to have plenty of room for outdoor gear and camera equipment.

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The main camera compartment is only accessible through the back. However, it has a large, sturdy waist strap that, when secured around you, lets you spin the bag around to the front and access everything without taking the bag entirely off.

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JPEGmini is compression software that's able to significantly reduce image file sizes with little to no visible loss in quality or details. If you want to free up storage space, it's definitely worth testing out.

Caption by / Photo by Joshua Goldman/CNET

Palette was definitely one of the most interesting pieces of gear at the show. Made mainly to work with Adobe software, there are buttons, dials and sliders that can be assigned and configured to handle different tasks.

Caption by / Photo by Joshua Goldman/CNET

They magnetically attach to each other, so they can be arranged in whatever way works best for your workflow. The brain, called the Core, connects to your computer via USB and powers all of the pieces.

Caption by / Photo by Joshua Goldman/CNET

The Starter kit is $199 (roughly £160, AU$260) and includes one of each component. The company's site has several tutorial videos so you can see just how you can put it to use day-to-day.

Caption by / Photo by Joshua Goldman/CNET
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