CNET también está disponible en español.

Ir a español

Don't show this again

Christmas Gift Guide

Nokia Bell Labs PicturePhone I prototype

Nokia Bell Labs Nuudle search software

Nokia Bell Labs mobile phone prototype

Nokia 5G network prototype

Drone network expansion

Nokia Bell Labs 5G low-latency network demo

Nokia Bell Labs external 5G antenna

Nokia Bell Labs transistor

Nokia Bell Labs PicturePhone II

Nokia Bell Labs touch-tone prototype

Nokia Bell Labs President Marcus Weldon

Nokia Bell Labs Airframe

Nokia Bell Labs text-first phone

Nokia Bell Labs camera phone

Nokia Bell Labs President Marcus Weldon

Nokia Bell Labs in Sunnyvale, California

Bell Labs is famous for everything from the transistor to verifying that the Big Bang really happened, but not all its work was a success. AT&T showed this Model I PicturePhone prototype at the 1964 World's Fair in New York. Video phones never made it to market, though.

Caption by / Photo by Stephen Shankland/CNET

Chris White of Nokia Bell Labs demonstrates the Nuudle "augmented thinking" software to help people sift through many types of data to get what they need.

Caption by / Photo by Stephen Shankland/CNET

Bell Labs' 1978 prototype mobile phone tested in Chicago, Illinois. The Advanced Mobile Phone Service (AMPS) program was based on a Bell Labs research paper from 1947 by Douglas Ring.

Caption by / Photo by Stephen Shankland/CNET

With 64 antennas, this Nokia Bell Labs network base station can beam data to up to eight smaller wireless stations, each of which brings high-speed, fast-response networks to nearby homes. It uses 5G technology called massive MIMO (multiple input, multiple output).

Caption by / Photo by Stephen Shankland/CNET

A drone at Nokia Bell Labs lands a portable, solar-powered, short-range high-speed network unit on a roof in a demonstration.

Caption by / Photo by Stephen Shankland/CNET

Domhnaill Hernon of Nokia Bell Labs shows the possibilities of 5G networks with a race car demo. With 5G communication delays of just a millionth of a second, people can pilot the cars remotely. With today's slower 4G, communication delays were too long for drivers to avoid obstacles. Low-latency networks will be important for tomorrow's self-driving cars.

Caption by / Photo by Stephen Shankland/CNET

Radio signals from next-gen 5G networks don't penetrate windows and walls well, so Nokia Bell Labs developed a system that pairs an outdoor antenna with an indoor link to the home network. The two are aligned precisely with strong magnets so they can transfer data even through triple-paned windows.

Caption by / Photo by Stephen Shankland/CNET

A scale model of the first transistor, developed at Bell Labs in 1947, is a couple of inches wide. It became the foundation of today's computer industry, with today's chips using billions of transistors.

Caption by / Photo by Stephen Shankland/CNET

A 1969 Model II PicturePhone prototype enabled two-way video calling and could receive computer data to show stock market reports and store catalogs.

Caption by / Photo by Stephen Shankland/CNET

Bell Labs developed this touch-tone phone prototype in the 1950s to replace slower-dialing rotary phones that used electrical relays. The first touch-tone phones arrived in 1963, but AT&T added the star and pound keys in 1968.

Caption by / Photo by Stephen Shankland/CNET

Nokia Bell Labs President Marcus Weldon shows his vision for future networks.

Caption by / Photo by Stephen Shankland/CNET

The Nokia Airframe brings some of the computing power of remote data centers closer to phones, self-driving cars and other networked devices. The close proximity overcomes delays that result from longer communication links.

Caption by / Photo by Stephen Shankland/CNET

Before Nokia lost its former dominance in the mobile phone market to Apple, Google, Samsung and others, it pioneered designs like this phone geared for text messaging.

Caption by / Photo by Stephen Shankland/CNET

The new iPhone 7 has dual cameras that enable 2X optical zoom. The Nokia N931, though, achieved 3X zoom by mounting its 3.2-megapixel camera sideways, operated with a flip-out screen.

Caption by / Photo by Stephen Shankland/CNET

Nokia Bell Labs President Marcus Weldon.

Caption by / Photo by Stephen Shankland/CNET

The Nokia Bell Labs facility in Sunnyvale, California, opened in 2011 and became a Bell Labs outpost after the 2016 acquisition of Alcatel-Lucent.

Caption by / Photo by Stephen Shankland/CNET
Published:
Up Next
15 creatures that could disappear w...
15