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The iPhone X's glass back

A wide-angle shot of the iPhone X shows the vertical dual camera lens and the LED flash sandwiched between. The dark gray Apple logo contrasts beautifully with the white back. If you look closely, you can also see the microphone in between the flash and the bottom lens. 

Published:Caption:Photo:Josh Miller/CNET

LED flash

The rear quad-LED flash was designed to help spread the light out to reduce hot spots in the photos we take. From this distance, it looks like some kind of ancient Egyptian relic. 

Published:Caption:Photo:Josh Miller/CNET

LED flash closer

Here's another look at what Apple calls its "Quad-LED True Tone Flash" along with both cameras, an f/1.8 wide-angle lens setup and a f/2.4 52mm-telephoto lens portrait mode setup.

Published:Caption:Photo:Josh Miller/CNET

LED flash bright

Here's the LED flash shining bright.

Published:Caption:Photo:Josh Miller/CNET

The front of the iPhone X

A wide-angle shot of the front of the iPhone X for reference. There's the infamous notch. It's a trend now with smartphones, thanks to Apple, but Huawei found a different way to implement it. 

Published:Caption:Photo:Josh Miller/CNET

Earpiece grille, selfie camera and facial ID sensors

The notch at the top houses the cameras, sensors for Face ID and the earpiece grille.

Published:Caption:Photo:Josh Miller/CNET

Antenna

On all four corners you will notice antenna lines. Also, while most phone screens have right-angled corners, the iPhone X's corners are rounded. For comparison, the Samsung Galaxy S9 also has rounded corners. 

This shot also lets you appreciate the phone's 2,436x1,125-pixel resolution.

Published:Caption:Photo:Josh Miller/CNET

More antenna

Another nice closeup view of one of the antenna lines. I really love how the reflection creates an appealing contrast of color in this shot 

Published:Caption:Photo:Josh Miller/CNET

Lightning port, microphone holes, speaker holes

A distressed look at the microphone holes (left), the Lightning port (center) and speaker holes (right). On either side of the Lightning port we see two Pentalobe screws, a five-point design that is unique to Apple. These screws are supposed to be tamper-proof. 

Published:Caption:Photo:Josh Miller/CNET

Lightning port and speaker holes

A much cleaner view of the bottom of a different, less-worn iPhone X. The details of the Pentalobe screws are well shown here.

Published:Caption:Photo:Josh Miller/CNET
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Mute switch and volume buttons

The left side view of the phone's silent switch and volume rocker buttons. That shiny metal really makes the phone stand out. 

Published:Caption:Photo:Josh Miller/CNET
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Nano-SIM card slot and side button

The right side of the X is home to a nano-SIM card slot and the side button, which will turn the phone on, put it to sleep, use Siri, Apple Pay and more.

Published:Caption:Photo:Josh Miller/CNET
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Logo

Apple's iconic logo behind the glass back plate of a silver model.  Depending on the lighting situation, the phone looks silver or white (see slide 2 in the gallery).

Published:Caption:Photo:Josh Miller/CNET
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Bauhaus

As most of these images show, this phone is gorgeous in the most Bauhaus kind of way.

Published:Caption:Photo:Josh Miller/CNET
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Wall-E?

The rear camera lens bump! Such a simple shot, but with so much detail. From the subtle reflections on the bottom of the lens enclosure, to the color contrasts of the somewhat purple lenses versus the black cover, to the very Wall-E-inspired look! Or maybe it's more H.E.R.B.I.E. the robot or Johnny 5...

Published:Caption:Photo:Josh Miller/CNET
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Macro photos of the Apple iPhone X

The iPhone X is one of the most gorgeous phones ever created. CNET photographer Josh Miller captured the phone's smallest details to prove exactly how beautiful it is.

Be sure to check out our full review of the iPhone X for a lot more detail. 

Published:Caption:Photo:Josh Miller/CNET
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