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Meet Roger Hill

Roger Hill runs a tornado tourism company called Silver Lining Tours. Hill and his wife Caryn drive thrill-seeking guests within a quarter mile of the 300 mph wind funnels.

Published:Caption:Photo:Barcroft Media/Getty Images
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The Hills have eyes

Hill lives in Colorado, where intense lightning storms are commonly visible from his Denver home.

Published:Caption:Photo:Roger Hill/Barcroft Media/Getty Images
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Brian Barnes cheated death

The guy in the blue shirt, left of the giant tornado, is Brian Barnes. A tornado almost killed him in 1993, when he was on the way to his high school prom. He has also been struck by lightning. Barnes chases storms and runs an extreme-weather tour company.

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A hail of a drive

Barnes captured this image of a hail-covered road while chasing a storm in Colorado.

Published:Caption:Photo:Brian Barnes/Barcroft Media/Getty Images
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Sometimes, you chase the storm...

Storm chasers Joel Taylor (left) and Reed Timmer (right) have been featured on Discovery Channel's reality TV series "Storm Chasers."

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...and sometimes, the storm chases you

A team of extreme-weather meteorologists were tracking storm data in Oklahoma when tornadoes suddenly appeared behind them.

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To get inside a tornado, drive a tank

Sean Casey also appeared on "Storm Chasers." He built two armored trucks, called Tornado Intercept Vehicles, to drive into the center of tornadoes. That's almost definitely better than doing it in a Prius.

Published:Caption:Photo:George Wilhelm/Los Angeles Times/Getty Images
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Do it for the Instagram pics

This tourist from London is seen casually posing in front of a monster storm outside of Hemmingford, Nebraska.

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We've got cows

Does this photo make anyone else want to watch "Twister"?

Published:Caption:Photo:Brian Barnes/Barcroft Media/Getty Images
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Dust comes at you fast

This cloud is called a haboob. A haboob is a cloud of dust kicked up by high winds, and standing inside of one can feel like being pelted with a million flying needles. Storm chaser Scott Wood set up the camera to capture this terrifying oncoming storm.

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Scott Wood isn't scared

And he stuck around for a while. Next question: Has Scott Wood seen "The Mummy"?

Published:Caption:Photo:Scott Wood/Barcroft Media/Getty Images
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That feeling when your camera needs a raincoat

This is professional storm chaser Katherine Bay. She's in a car in the middle of Hurricane Jeanne, documenting plus 100 mph winds while driving in a foot of water in Vero Beach, Fla.

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Multitasking can be dangerous

Holding an umbrella in a storm is difficult enough. Doing that while adjusting the shutter speed, focus and ISO on a camera is another thing entirely. This photo was taken by storm chaser Mike Kirk of his son and storm-chasing partner Shane, whose photography focuses on lightning.

Published:Caption:Photo:Shane Kirk/Barcroft Media/Getty Images
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This is a supercell and it can be stronger than a hurricane

Supercell storms are rare, but the contained rotating storm systems can sustain winds in excess of 92 mph.

Published:Caption:Photo:Robert Sinner/LSM/Barcroft Media/Getty Images
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Supercells make super hail

Supercell storms also produce baseball-sized hail. That makes sticking around to watch them that much more dangerous.

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Another view of a supercell

This supercell reportedly generated a tornado near Piedmont, Oklahoma.

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Storm chasing at night

Storm chasers were tracking a tornado when this bolt of lightning lit up the dark sky.

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A very dark sky

These rainbows appeared as a severe thunderstorm moved across the plains from Kansas to Colorado.

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It took 7 years to capture this moment

Greg McCown is a real estate agent by day and a storm chaser by night. He tried for seven years to photograph a lightning bolt and a rainbow in the same image. McCown used a lightning shutter trigger on his camera to capture the moment.

Published:Caption:Photo:Greg McCown/Barcroft USA/Getty Images
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Even hurricanes are no match for storm chasers

Storm chaser and meteorologist Michael Phelps walks through the storm surge of Hurricane Isabel as the storm makes landfall near Cape Hatteras, North Carolina.

Published:Caption:Photo:Jim Reed/Corbis/Getty Images
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