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Web geeks show off new tools

Web geeks show off new tools

The Carson Future of Web Apps conference is a gathering primarily of Web developers, and most of the discussions here are for developers--why APIs are good, how to engineer a social network, where to get a Web 2.0 job, and so on. But there was one session where the developers got to show off their new online applications. For example:

Adobe sent a Flex evangelist, who demonstrated a mashup called TagTV, which pulled images from both YouTube and Flickr and put them on one Web-based desktop. From a user perspective, it's slick but not revolutionary. But then the presenter showed how he could pull the TagTV application off the Web page and run it on the PC desktop, liberating it from the browser.

BeRecruited is a service that helps colleges recruit high-school students for sports teams. The site was launched back in 2000. It's become a bit of a social network, where coaches troll for athletes and vice versa. Athletes can post their academic records and game videos online. Coaches can search for particular attributes, set up standing orders for what they're looking for (for example, sport, position, height, weight, geographical region), then get notified when new athletes enter the network who meet their criteria.

Celum Imagine is a media management tool for enterprises. It's a central repository for a company's photos, videos, presentations, and drawings. Users work off their company's Celum server (or a Celum-hosted offsite server), so assets are kept secure in the company. However, users can also share particular assets with people outside their company. This looks like a useful service for media professionals, and also for PowerPoint jockeys who are always searching around in their company for the latest approved templates and images to build their slide shows.

MercuryGrove is an enterprise development company that's trying to push Web 2.0 concepts into corporate applications. It tries to put design first, and encourage collaboration and communication among all interested parties. Looks like a competitor to Basecamp.

Sxip makes identity management tools. The company is working on a tool, called Whobar, that Web developers can use to help them manage or use the new identity protocols such as Windows CardSpace, iNames, and OpenID.

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