Trump tweets he'll separate himself from his business empire

Technically Incorrect: The president-elect again chooses Twitter to make what some might see as a major announcement.

Technically Incorrect offers a slightly twisted take on the tech that's taken over our lives.


Donald Trump dining on Tuesday with Mitt Romney. Might Romney be asked to run the Trump Organization?

Photo by Drew Angerer, Getty Images

I understand that some members of the media are upset that Donald Trump hasn't held a press conference since July.

But who's ever tuned in to a presidential news conference? Are they on C-SPAN or somewhere?

Twitter accounts are far more accessible. So it's a delight that the president-elect chooses to communicate very regularly by tweeting.

On Wednesday, he made yet another fascinating revelation on Twitter. He announced he's holding a press conference.

Oh.

This, however, won't be your ordinary press conference, where platitudes are served and swallowed.

Trump tweeted: "I will be holding a major news conference in New York City with my children on December 15 to discuss the fact that I will be leaving my..."

That's the problem with Twitter -- not enough characters. How many feared the next tweet would begin with the words "wife" or "penthouse apartment"?

Relief was surely felt when the next tweet read: "great business in total in order to fully focus on running the country in order to MAKE AMERICA GREAT AGAIN! While I am not mandated to ..."

Not mandated to tweet on a regular basis? No, he's not mandated to "do this under the law, I feel it is visually important, as President, to in no way have a conflict of interest with my various businesses.."

He added: "Hence, legal documents are being crafted which take me completely out of business operations. The Presidency is a far more important task!"

Those of supportive mind will be delighted that, as president, Trump intends to focus entirely on the far more important task.

Those of critical bent, however, will stare at a couple of essences.

Firstly, it seems that he may hand over the business to his children. This surely won't mean that he will shun them for the duration of his presidency. There will still be a thought in many minds that this business separation is virtual, rather than actual.

And then there's the phrase "visually important." Detractors will mutter: "Ah, this separation is virtual, rather than actual."

Once the legal papers have been crafted, legal scholars will appear and opine on C-SPAN.

I wonder how many real people will watch. Most, I suspect, will be hoping that any tax cuts being offered will benefit them, so that they, too, can launch their own great business and, who knows, one day run for president.

This is the new American Dream.

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