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The car skin, for when a bumper sticker is too discreet

Technically Incorrect: A new Kickstarter campaign from StickOut.com aims to get people to adorn the whole sides of their cars with enormous stickers. Vote now.

Technically Incorrect offers a slightly twisted take on the tech that's taken over our lives.


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Surely this would make your local driveway a more exciting place. StickOut.com

Politics is all about shouting loud and projecting your message time and time again.

It's a wonder, then, that bumper stickers are so, well, discreet.

Yes, they might proclaim the name of the candidate or make some joke about his opponent. But they generally project from the back of the car, so the sticker owner doesn't often see the full persuasive effect of the message on others.

Now there is change that you might be able to believe in and bathe in. For a company called StickOut.com is launching a Kickstarter campaign to support what it says are the first vast body panel stickers that you can apply yourself.

You might be wondering just how easy it is to slather your car with glory like this.

Stickout's founder Gera Waisbaum told me: "We provide a DIY kit for easy installation. Our artwork is printed on top-of-the-line laminated vehicle vinyl, the very same material used in professional car wraps, which is designed for easy installation and many years of durability. The artwork can be easily remove without any residue or damage to the car, even many years after the application."

Don't those sound like the words of a politician? Still, think of the impact in your neighborhood when your nice new Audi is adorned with a Clinton arrow that helpfully tells people which direction your car (and the country) is going.

But how can you know that the sticker will fit perfectly?

Waisbaum explained: "We developed the StickOut technology that allows us to customize the skins based on the car pictures. We licensed probably the largest car pictures database in the world, which is used for this purpose. Our technology allows us to create printing files including cutting instructions out of the graphics position by the customer in StickOut Style Lab. The customer doesn't have to measure anything."

Clearly, the only potential use isn't political messages. Indeed, when it comes to the various campaigns, Waisbaum told me: "Campaigns have copyrights on the official logos and do not allow anyone to profit for the logo design (except the candidates). We hope to partner with the campaigns to create official designed campaign StickOuts to support the candidates. However, we are going to be offering alternative campaign support designs once more candidates announce their intentions to run for office.

Now there's some amusement you can have when everything hots up (and you just can't bear watching any more political coverage on TV.)

The current StickOn artwork pages contain hundreds of suggestions. You can beautify your vehicle with images of your serial lovers, your favorite soccer team or, should you be that way inclined, a (Photoshopped) picture of Donald Trump hugging Elizabeth Warren. (Note: I am using my imagination here and suggest you have legal clearance for the image.)

What drove Waisbaum to conceive of such a company? He told me: "I had just purchased a new skin for my phone and it got me thinking: People want their phones to look different, their clothes -- you can even get custom cupcakes. Why not cars?"

Who can argue with his logic, if not with the potential besmirchment of so many neighborhoods?

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