Sci-Tech

SpaceX's latest launch was less exciting, and that's OK

Elon Musk's space company has successfully sent a payload into space for the 12th time this year. We're not sure if we should applaud or yawn.

liftoff

A Falcon 9 rocket lifts off carrying a Taiwanese satellite.

SpaceX

Another week, another successful rocket launch and recovery by Elon Musk's groundbreaking, Mars-seeking company, SpaceX. 

A Falcon 9 rocket launched on Thursday from California's Vandenberg Air Force Base, deployed the FORMOSAT-5 Earth observation satellite for Taiwan's National Space Organization and then landed its first stage on a droneship in the Pacific Ocean.

Just another day at the office... in space.

 It's hard to believe it was less than two years ago that a SpaceX Falcon 9 landing was an elusive and unprecedented achievement. And it was less than a year ago that the company voluntarily put all its missions on hold following an explosion during a test at Cape Canaveral.

But since the company resumed launches in January, it has built up a record of competent and consistently successful missions. Thursday's satellite launch was the 12th SpaceX mission this year, meaning the company could reach its goal of weekly launches by 2019. 

Frankly, it's beginning to reach the point where covering these launches is becoming, well, a little boring. 

And this is actually good news for SpaceX as a business, as much as Musk may love to cultivate his relationship with the media. As Falcon 9 launches become more routine and less newsworthy, business can boom for SpaceX while also laying the groundwork and demand for Musk's next big thing. The larger, more powerful Falcon Heavy rocket is set for a demonstration launch later this year. 

From there, it's on to a metropolis on Mars, if Musk is to be believed. But until then it's about working up to making another week, another rocket launch a reality.

You can watch the latest routine Falcon 9 launch below.

Technically Literate: Original works of short fiction with unique perspectives on tech, exclusively on CNET.

Crowd ControlA crowdsourced science fiction novel written by CNET readers.