CNET también está disponible en español.

Ir a español

Don't show this again

Gaming

Sony hires private investigators after theft of 100 million users' data

The FBI is looking into the astonishing data theft on the PlayStation Network, but like all good film noir characters, Sony doesn't trust the feds and has turned to a private eye.

Sony has recruited private investigators to try and sort out the disastrous hack attack on its PlayStation Network, in which personal and financial details of over 100 million users were stolen by daring data thieves.

The FBI is looking into the astonishing data theft, but like all good film noir characters, Sony doesn't trust the feds and has turned to a private eye. Investigators from cyber-security firms Guidance Software and Data Forte are among those polishing their magnifying glasses, tightening their trenchcoats and hunting for cyber-clues.

The data detectives may be assisting with the hunt for the hackers, or they may be involved in tightening Sony's security to prevent this from happening again.

The PlayStation Network went offline on 20 April. A week later Sony revealed its servers had been hacked, losing the name, address, birthday and email address of more than 70 million PlayStation Network and Qriocity users. Yesterday Sony also shut the Sony Online Entertainment site, admitting that data had been compromised for up to 25 million more users.

Credit card details have been stolen, although Sony claims from an "outdated database". That's little comfort, frankly, especially as it's the direct debit and credit details of thousands of European customers that are in the wild. Experts warn you'd be well advised to cancel your bank card and change your passwords before the thieves decide to use your data.

Sony boss Sir Howard Stringer has so far stayed silent on the matter, cancelling a planned appearance at the Sony World Photography Awards attended by Crave last week.