CNET también está disponible en español.

Ir a español

Don't show this again

Christmas Gift Guide
Tech Industry

SCO falls short in 1998

A profitable fourth quarter for Santa Cruz Operation isn't enough to pull the company into the black.

A profitable fourth quarter for Santa Cruz Operation wasn't enough to pull the company into the black for this fiscal year.

SCO reported a fourth-quarter net profit of $2.7 million, or 8 cents per share, compared to a net profit of $4.5 million, or 12 cents per share, in the same quarter last year.

Yet for fiscal 1998, SCO had a net loss of $14.7 million, or 41 cents per share, compared to a net loss last year of $15.2 million, or 4 cents per share. Unlike this year's numbers, 1997's net loss included a one-time $8.4 million restructuring charge.

SCO's UnixWare operating system holds a 80-percent stake in the Intel-powered Unix systems market, said Dan Kusnetzky of International Data Corporation. Nonetheless, the company's foothold--low-end servers--is a market that is under attack by Linux supporters, Microsoft, Novell, and others.

Today, SCO and IBM announced that the two companies will combine their two Unix offerings into a new version of Unix. The new Unix OS, expected in 18 months, is being designed primarily to run on servers and workstations built around Intel's processors. Code-named Monterey, the new OS will be based on technology from both companies and Sequent, known for its high-powered corporate multiprocessor machines.

SCO hopes to benefit from more powerful Intel-based systems capable of running Unix and the spread of its UnixWare in commercial computing.