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NRA condemns games, releases FPS for kids

America's National Rifle Association followed the Sandy Hook Elementary shooting by blaming, among other things, video games. Now, the pro-firearm organisation has released a first-person shooter on iOS.

(Screenshot by Michelle Starr/CNET Australia)

America's National Rifle Association (NRA) followed the Sandy Hook Elementary shooting by blaming, among other things, video games. Now, the pro-firearm organisation has released a first-person shooter on iOS.

On 21 December 2012 — a week after the Sandy Hook school shooting in Connecticut, US — the NRA held a press conference.

"There exists in this country, sadly, a callous, corrupt and corrupting shadow industry that sells and sows violence against its own people," said CEO Wayne LaPierre, "through vicious, violent video games, with names like Bulletstorm, Grand Theft Auto, Mortal Kombat and Splatterhouse."

No mention was made of its own titles — and now, the organisation has released NRA: Practice Range, an iOS game for ages 4+.

It bills itself as "the NRA's new mobile nerve centre, delivering one-touch access to the NRA network of news, laws, facts, knowledge, safety tips, educational materials and online resources". However, it also includes a first-person target range, where you can practice with nine different weapons on three different ranges — one of which uses humanoid targets.

You start off with a Beretta M9, but, for AU$0.99 a pop, you can get a Beretta 92, a Browning, a Colt — all the way up to an MK11 sniper rifle.

It's a badly designed iOS game with frankly quite awful controls, so its efficacy as a "training" tool can be laughed right off the table. The game does include gun-safety tips and gun law information for the US; at best, it's a misguided attempt to make a "responsible" shooting game. However, all it really does is demonstrate the NRA's rank hypocrisy.

Via thinkprogress.org