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Not recycling is more immoral than watching porn, say teens in study

Technically Incorrect: A pornography study by a faith-focused group says porn is increasingly becoming accepted in society, as it's safer than actual sex.

Technically Incorrect offers a slightly twisted take on the tech that's taken over our lives.


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And soon we will all be watching porn like this?

CNET

One person's morality is the next person's source of humor.

We all try to make sense of the world, and as we're growing up, we realize that the way our elders made sense of the world was often quite twisted.

Take porn. These days access to it is, well, free and easy. It's not stunning, then, that young people are increasingly accepting it as a normal part of everyday existence.

A new study by faith-focused research organization the Barna Group offers a little voyeurism into this phenomenon.

Perhaps the one statistic that most shows how young people's concerns have presumably altered over time is this: 32 percent of young respondents said watching porn is "usually or always wrong." 56 percent said the same about not recycling.

When push comes to love, young people seem rather more concerned about whether their planet will survive than whether they will be cast into hell for watching others having sex.

There are more stimulating nuggets from this survey of 3,000 people, both young and older. (The full study will be published in April.)

Almost half the young respondents said they encountered porn at least once a week -- even on those rare occasions when they weren't actually looking for it. More than half of women under 25 said they seek out porn. (Among men under 25, the number was 81 percent.)

The study also explains that one reason both teens and older adults turn to porn is because it's less risky than actual sex.

Morality, though, is a curious thing. While many people might be more accepting of porn as a regular part of one's psychological diet, there is less forgiveness when a man of the cloth indulges.

Among adult Christians studied, 41 percent said pastors should be fired or asked to resign if they're found to have sneaked a peek at porn.

The personal guilt associated with porn seems to be rapidly abating, however.

The researchers say that a small minority of adults feel guilt about watching pleasures of the flesh. Teens are the most likely to feel guilt, but these are still a small minority. Practicing Christians are twice as likely to feel they're doing something immoral.

The vast majority of these respondents said they watched porn online. Perhaps that very ease -- and a certain social liberalism among people in general -- has led to an acceptance of the idea that porn is really just porn, something to be enjoyed, rather than feared.

This research put it very openly: "People use porn for the obvious: arousal. But also for boredom, curiosity and fun."

So it's not too dissimilar to sex, then, is it?