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New tools bolster Net protection

Newly formed Network Associates will ship a suite of Net security tools that includes protection against hostile Java and ActiveX components.

    The newly formed Network Associates (NETA) this week is shipping a suite of Internet security tools that includes protection against hostile Java and ActiveX components.

    Network Associates, which was formed as a result of the McAfee Associates-Network General merger, Wednesday will debut WebShieldX, a gateway software filter that protects against malicious Java and ActiveX components as well as viruses. To protect an internal network, the product checks incoming applets against a list of known malicious code compiled and updated every two months by Network Associates.

    A second portion of the product can run as a dedicated mail filter to scan email subject lines and body text for key words. For example, if a network administrator is worried that employees are leaking confidential information, she can instruct WebShieldX to flag any instances of words such as "budget" or "project." As of now, the product does not have the ability to scan for key words in attached messages.

    WebShield can run as a proxy server, but only on Microsoft Proxy Server 2.0 running on Windows NT. A version for the Solaris flavor of Unix will be available in January.

    WebShieldX ships as part of the Internet Security Suite. The suite also includes previously available products:

  • The WebWall firewall that runs as a dedicated Linux server.

  • NetCrypto, for encryption and authentication over intranets running on Windows 95/NT and ten flavors of Unix.

  • WebScan X, which protects mobile Windows 95 and NT desktops against hostile applets and viruses when the user is beyond the company firewall.

    For 1,001 to 2,000 users, the Internet Security Suite costs $14 per seat. When the volume goes up to 10,000 to 20,000 users, the price drops to $11 per seat.

    The company plans to release in January a suite of products by Pretty Good Privacy, the encryption software company it recently purchased for $35 million.