New hacker attack uses screensavers

A new Trojan horse program sent by a hacker over the Internet via an email spam format as a screensaver could allow PCs to be accessed by unauthorized users.

A new Trojan horse program sent by a hacker over the Internet via an email spam format as a screensaver could allow PCs to be accessed by unauthorized users.

BackDoor-G Trojan horse is considered a potentially dangerous new Trojan horse program that could allow hackers to remotely access and control infected PCs over the Internet, according to network security and management software maker Network Associates.

BackDoor-G affects Windows-based PCs. When executed, BackDoor-G turns a user's system into a client system for a hacker, giving virtually unlimited remote access to the system over the Internet. The Trojan also is virtually undetectable by the user, although it has been reported as spreading as a screensaver and an update to a computer game.

The program is the latest in a string of new hybrid security threats that blur the line between viruses, security exploits, and malicious code attacks, the company said.

BackDoor-G is difficult to detect because it is able to change its filename and therefore hide from some traditional virus eradication methods such as simply deleting suspicious files.

Though BackDoor-G is not technically a virus, Network Associates advises PC users to request an update for both their antivirus and intrusion-detection software from their system administrators.

Sal Viveros, group marketing manager for Total Virus Defense at Network Associates, said the company has received a few dozen samples of the attack since midmorning yesterday.

"There is no one file name it uses," he said. "It spreads everywhere in the system.

"There is a trend here. We're seeing more and more programs that are stealing information or creating holes to get access to systems remotely," Viveros added.

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