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New and Noteworthy: iPod repair program; Apple to open London retail store; more

New and Noteworthy: iPod repair program; Apple to open London retail store; more

iPod repair program MacResQ has launched a new flat-fee repair service for Apple iPods. The service will purportedly offer 24-hour turnaround on repairs and nationwide, as well as overnight pickup and delivery at the user's location. The cost of the iPodResQ 24-Hour Repair Service is US$29 This includes the 3-way overnight shipping, the initial diagnostic service, and the iBox, which the customer may keep for future use. The "iQ" Battery Replacement priced at US $79. More.

Apple to open London retail store The Register references a London Times report that Apple's first European retail store will open on London's Regent Street later this year, in time for Christmas, the Times reports today. "According to the report, Apple will pay around £1.5 million a year to rent the prestigious 20,000sq ft location, currently being redeveloped by its owner, the Crown Estate (prop. HM the Queen)." More.

The iPod outdone by... the iPod mini The Washington Post has some praise for the iPod mini, which is now shipping. "Finally, somebody has outdone the iPod. After years of unsuccessful attempts by Creative, Dell, Rio, Samsung and others to knock Apple's MP3 player off its pedestal, we've got a player that makes the iPod seem like the oversize, clunky relic it (now) is. That player is Apple's iPod mini, a $249 gadget not much bigger than a cell phone. On sale starting Friday, it packs the old iPod's virtues into a smaller, lighter, sturdier, more elegant and cheaper design." More.

Experts Warn of Microsoft 'Monoculture' Dan Geer is one of the many experts heralding an idea, borrowed from biology, that Microsoft Corp. has nurtured a software "monoculture" that threatens global computer security. The Associated Press reprots "Geer and others believe Microsoft's software is so dangerously pervasive that a virus capable of exploiting even a single flaw in its operating systems could wreak havoc. Just this past week, Microsoft warned customers about security problems that independent experts called among the most serious yet disclosed. Network administrators could only hope users would download the latest patch." More.

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