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New and Noteworthy: HP and Apple deal: the ramifications; Apple shows how it uses its own equipment; more

New and Noteworthy: HP and Apple deal: the ramifications; Apple shows how it uses its own equipment; more

HP and Apple deal: the ramifications The New York Times has an article analyzing some of the elements that went into the monumental HP-Apple iPod deal, and what is means for the industry at large: "The agreement - which was completed only after an extensive bargaining session that ran long into Wednesday night between Carleton S. Fiorina, Hewlett's chief executive, and Apple's Steven P. Jobs - represents a significant departure for both companies. For the first time, Mr. Jobs has stepped away from the self-enclosed Apple-only strategy he has pursued since he returned to run the company in 1997. Meanwhile, Hewlett, the second-largest computer maker in the world, has put its software partner, Microsoft, on notice that it will not necessarily follow its lead in every case. The deal calls for Apple to make its popular iPod player in a Hewlett corporate blue hue, while Hewlett, starting this summer, will place an icon on the desktop of its consumer PC's, directing its customers to Apple's software and music store. Financial terms were not disclosed and the alliance does not include - at least not yet - the new mini-iPod that Apple announced earlier this week." More.

Apple shows how it uses its own equipment CNET reports that Apple drinks its own juice. "Trying to make the case that its products belong in large companies, Apple showed how it runs its own business using a great deal of Apple gear. The disclosures, offered by Apple senior IT director Dean Rally, came as part of a discussion on Apple's role in the enterprise during the "Mac IT" portion of this year's Macworld Expo." More.

Will people pay for mini iPod? Newsweek tries to determine whether or not users will be willing to spring for a US$250 iPod. "I suspect that most Apple customers feel like I do now: I?d love a gorgeous, compact iPod mini, but don?t want to give up the thousands of songs I have stored on my current model. Steve Jobs suggests a compromise: 'I think that one of the biggest customers for the mini is going to be current owners buying a second iPod. They?re going to have both?when I go on a trip I take my whole library with my iPod and when I go to the gym I take the mini.' How?s that for a low-price strategy?" More.

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