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New & Noteworthy: QuickTime Live!; Home video editing; proposed penalties for hackers and virus authors; more

New & Noteworthy: QuickTime Live!; Home video editing; proposed penalties for hackers and virus authors; more

QuickTime Live! conference rescheduled MacCentral reports that Apple has rescheduled its QuickTime Live! conference. Formerly set to take place October 8-11 at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills, CA, the conference is now scheduled for February 10-14, 2002.

Current home video editing equals million-dollar studio From the Houston Chronicle: "It used to cost me (actually, my client) $5,000 or $10,000 just to edit a single 30-second commercial. Today, I can buy everything I need to make real broadcast-quality video -- a Macintosh, Apple's iMovie2 (or even Final Cut Pro), and an inexpensive digital video camcorder -- for less than $5,000." More.

Hackers face life imprisonment under 'Anti-Terrorism' Act From SecurityFocus: "Hackers, virus-writers and web site defacers would face life imprisonment without the possibility of parole under legislation proposed by the Bush Administration that would classify most computer crimes as acts of terrorism." More.

GoGoGo 4.2 is the latest release of this Web filtering software package.

Quiet copy protection for consumer audio CDs? From ZDNet: "Digital rights activists are angered by evidence that the new Michael Jackson CD "Rock Your World" will not be playable in PC CD-ROM drives. The record label's decision to modify the CD singles so that they are only playable by stereo systems risks breaching trading standards, as no warnings are included on the packaging." More.

Universal plans protection for all CDs From CNet/Reuters: "Vivendi Universal's Universal Music Group plans to start issuing CDs in October with software that prevents music from being digitally copied into computer files." More.

Yahoo news hacking highlights quiet danger From CNN: "The dangers of Internet worms and viruses are well known, but security experts are warning of a more pernicious and potentially more damaging kind of attack -- the manipulation of content on trusted Web sites." More.

AOL TW, IDG to Divvy Standard’s Assets From the Industry Standard: "The publishing giants agree to buy the remains of once-proud Standard Media International for a total of $1.4 million." More.