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More U.K. gov't services coming online

About 75 percent of the services provided by central government in the United Kingdom will be available online by the end of this year, an official from the Office of the e-Envoy said. Stephen Marsh, the office's director of security policy, said, however, that lack of trust in the Internet will hamper the government in reaching its target to put all government services online by 2005. Fifty-four percent of central government services are online already, Marsh said. However, the majority of the systems online so far are just information-providing Web sites, not transactional services, he said. Most of those that need to authenticate people, such as the Inland Revenue, will not do so online, but will use a password sent on paper through the mail, as most banks do, he said. ZDNet U.K.'s Peter Judge reported from London. To view the full story, visit ZDNet U.K.

About 75 percent of the services provided by central government in the United Kingdom will be available online by the end of this year, an official from the Office of the e-Envoy said. Stephen Marsh, the office's director of security policy, said, however, that lack of trust in the Internet will hamper the government in reaching its target to put all government services online by 2005.

Fifty-four percent of central government services are online already, Marsh said. However, the majority of the systems online so far are just information-providing Web sites, not transactional services, he said. Most of those that need to authenticate people, such as the Inland Revenue, will not do so online, but will use a password sent on paper through the mail, as most banks do, he said.

ZDNet U.K.'s Peter Judge reported from London.

To view the full story, visit ZDNet U.K.