CNET también está disponible en español.

Ir a español

Don't show this again

Services

More alternatives to Microsoft

A News.com reader writes that now might be a good time to help Microsoft lock itself into a corner by using free, better alternatives to its proprietary, half-baked solutions to old problems.

     

      
    More alternatives to Microsoft

    In response to the April 15 Perspectives column by Bruce Perens, "The Microsoft penalty that isn't":

    Given that Microsoft tries all it can to stop others from producing software that can interoperate with theirs, perhaps now would be a good time to help Microsoft lock itself into a corner by using free, better alternatives to its proprietary, half-baked solutions to old problems.

    Instead of Windows file sharing, why not use the advanced, fast and secure AFS file system? IBM Pittsburgh Lab (formerly the Transarc Corporation) has made a branch of the source code of its commercial version available under an open-source-style license. Compiled and ready-to-install versions for Windows, Linux and several other operating systems are available from OpenAFS.

    Now would also be a good time for governments to stop spending tax money on overly expensive (and in many cases unnecessary) licenses for Microsoft Office, Microsoft Windows and others, as there are equally good, if not better, open, free and modern alternatives. At many organizations, administrators do their best to lock down their Windows workstations. In many cases, people can't even rearrange the icons on their desktops, even less install new software. Linux or a good Unix system would be an equally good and far less expensive--both purchase-wise and maintenance-wise--alternative here.

    Another thing to consider is that Microsoft software is single-sourced, which would make it a risky choice in the minds of many large corporations and governments.

    Robert Claeson
    Stockholm, Sweden

     

     

        
    Latest Headlines
    display on desktop
    Netscape, not IE, put on new CompuServe
    Music sales dip; Net seen as culprit
    Industry group issues privacy standard
    Face recognition grew even before 9/11
    Schwab profit dips on slack trading
    AMD chief testifies in Microsoft's favor
    Gateway cuts price on wireless bundle
    Amazon defends used book sales
    Softbank sells Yahoo shares
    Adobe ships new Photoshop
    Microsoft expo tunes into the home
    Google protects its search results
    Sendmail nabs funding, expands
    Homestore revamps contract with Realtors
    PayPal mum on possible eBay deal
    Start-up nears launch for Hiptop handheld
    U.S. won't toss out antitrust claims
    Voice-over-DSL maker Jetstream closes
    FTC expands anti-fraud sweeps
    This week's headlines