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Microsoft's Mundie missing metrics

A News.com reader says most tech innovations came through the practice of sharing resources and ideas and could never have occurred via any other model than open source.

 

  
Microsoft's Mundie missing metrics

In response to the May 17 Soapbox column by Craig Mundie, "Commercial software, sustainable innovation":

"The last 50 years of public- and private-sector collaboration has demonstrated that when intellectual property rights are protected, innovators are rewarded for their efforts. Furthermore, technology is advanced guaranteeing economic growth and a cycle of future collaboration, investment and innovation..."

Demonstrated how, exactly?

The truth is, no metrics are or have been collected and maintained to produce the type of projections the author of this article has attempted to pass off as accepted fact.

Our industry is still very much in its infancy. I don't believe there was ever any period in the Internet industry where no open-source projects were being fostered, and therefore all innovation in this industry occurred at a time when many innovations were due to the work a of either a small start-up, a standards committee, a technology group, or a college masters program or study. (Think VRML, Linux, Mosaic, Napster, Future Splash, and so on and so on.)

Most of these innovations came through the practice of sharing resources and ideas and could never have occurred via any other model than open source. I'm sorry that this article's author decided to trade his credibility for cash to become Microsoft's latest mouthpiece. At the very least this author's opinions and analysis will have greatly diminished impact.

I previously had held Craig Mundie in high regard, and it pains me to no end to witness this kind of reprehensible behavior. CNET should be more selective in whom they chose to represent their views of our industry.

Barkley Anderson
Chicago, Ill.