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Microsoft sitting pretty with Supreme Court decision

The U.S. Supreme Court sends Microsoft's antitrust case back to a lower court for review, a setback for the government that ends months of legal jockeying and speculation.

 

Microsoft stock jumps; Feds suffer setback in antitrust case

By CNET News.com Staff
September 26, 2000, 2 p.m. PT

The U.S. Supreme Court sends Microsoft's antitrust case back to a lower court for review, a setback for the government that ends months of legal jockeying and speculation.
 

Shares rise on word of extended trial
update The U.S. Supreme Court's decision today to have a lower court hear Microsoft's appeal will likely boost the allure of the company's stock, investors say.

Microsoft scores antitrust point
Legal experts say the court's decision scores a point for Microsoft in its long-running contest against the government, even though the game is a long way from being over.

Appeals court quickly puts case in motion
The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit wastes no time, issuing an order requiring that Microsoft file a proposed appeals schedule by Oct. 2.

Supreme Court won't take antitrust case
update With today's order, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit will assume jurisdiction in the case and set a schedule for further proceedings.

Breakup: Court calls for Microsoft split
special coverage A judge decides that Microsoft can retain its operating systems for PCs and other devices. But the company would be forced to create a separate firm for its other software and Net products.

 

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Kevin Arquit
Attorney, Clifford Chance 
Why the Supreme Court refused to hear the landmark case.

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Bill Kovacic
George Washington University Law Professor 
Explains what Microsoft's appeal being sent to a lower court really means. 
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Microsoft nemesis leaving DOJ
update Joel Klein, the head of the Justice Department's antitrust division who led the government's case against Microsoft, plans to resign at the end of September.

Giant loses another key executive
update Senior Microsoft executive Paul Maritz is stepping down after 14 years, adding to the list of high-level defections from the company.

Microsoft optimistic despite breakup threat
Microsoft's senior executives paint a rosy and profitable future, despite the possibility of a company breakup as its antitrust case winds through the courts.