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Mars colonists wanted, apply within

Mars One is attempting to be first off the Mars colony rank, recruiting intrepid space pioneers for its reality show-style project.

A render of what the Mars One colony may look like.
(Credit: Mars One)

Mars One is attempting to be first off the Mars colony rank, recruiting intrepid space pioneers for its reality show-style project.

Mars is set to be the hot space-exploration topic of 2013. A constant stream of information coming from the Curiosity rover is just the start; in the latter half of last year, NASA announced its plans for manned missions to the red planet sometime in the 2030s, and SpaceX's Elon Musk detailed his thoughts on colonisation.

But Mars One is trying to beat everyone to the punch. The company, which is based in the Netherlands, has released its application criteria ahead of recruitment, which is set to start in the first half of 2013.

Anyone in the world who is over the age of 18 can apply to become a Mars One astronaut.

According to the website:

In spaceflight missions, the primary personal attributes of a successful astronaut are emotional and psychological stability, supported by personal drive and motivation. This is the foundation upon a mission must be built, where human lives are at risk with each flight.

Once on Mars, there is no means to return to Earth. Mars is home. A grounded, deep sense of purpose will help each astronaut maintain his or her psychological stability and focus as they work together toward a shared and better future.

To that end, applicants must demonstrate resiliency, adaptability, curiosity, the ability to trust, creativity and resourcefulness.

That will only get you through the door, however. There are four rounds in the recruitment process: firstly, the application submission, which will include a video detailing why you are the best candidate to go to Mars; then a medical examination must be passed; then there will be a series of challenges (which may or may not be televised); and then, finally, the candidate must be able to speak English, live in harsh conditions and work with others under difficult circumstances.

Before you sign up, though, there are a few health risks that haven't really been solved yet. But, either way, heading to Mars is still going to be a one-way trip.

Via www.wired.com