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Police tweet slyly appeals to owner of 5.5 pounds of marijuana

Commentary: A large amount of pot was apparently delivered to the wrong address.

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Screenshot by Chris Matyszczyk/CNET

There's little more glorious than authority figures with a sense of humor.

Especially if those authority figures are police officers.

In recent times, the police have taken to social media to show they're not just gruff men and women in uniform, but chuckle-meisters who could one day perform in Vegas.

We've had police turn to Facebook to threaten Nickelback with crimes against music. We've seen them threaten drunk drivers on Twitter with a promise to play One Direction.

We've even witnessed them tweeting a stoner's to-do list.

The police in Columbus, Indiana, have taken sly humor a step further. On Tuesday, they tweeted a picture of several bags of marijuana.

Was this an enticement? Well, more of a witty entrapment. The tweet reads: "Looking for owner of 5.5 pounds of marijuana delivered to the wrong address today. Stop by the police station to claim. Dont forget your ID."

They could be warming up for Carrot Top one day.

Lt. Matt Harris of the Columbus Police told me that a parcel company tried to deliver the package to a nonexistent address.

"At some point, the parcel was opened and it was determined that it contained narcotics," he said. This led to the idea for the amusing tweet. The parcel has yet to be claimed.

The tweet has already enjoyed almost 1,000 retweets and about 1,300 likes.

When you put your wit out there, though, it's like gunfire. You have to be prepared for some coming the other way.

So it was that Twitterers responded the post. For example, this tweet from Big Meanie: "we all know it was originally 8 pounds but you stole some."

First published Jan. 27, 7:41 a.m. PT.
Update, 8:55 a.m. PT
: Comment added from Columbus Police Department.

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