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Make the DMCA go away

A News.com reader writes that the DMCA is a salient example of the current state of congressional politics, and a law that should never have seen the light of day.

     

      
    Make the DMCA go away

    In response to the Jan. 29 column by Rep. Rick Boucher, "Time to rewrite the DMCA":

    The DMCA is a salient example of the current state of congressional politics, and a law that should never have seen the light of day. Hatched in the backrooms of special-interest politics, it was a bird that was never intended to land on the shoulder of democracy.

    Hopefully, those who were blinded now recognize the final years of the 20th century to be a time when personal indulgence, avarice, deception and outright stupidity would make an assault on the systems of checks and balances we hold so dear. The inevitable implosion of an overvalued economy predictably provided the catalyst that would result in the current "nightmare of the dismal science" with no relief in sight.

    The DMCA should rightfully join the ranks of a list of the incorrigible and failed applications of the rule of law, including the likes of Microsoft, Enron and many yet to come.

    The price of freedom is eternal vigilance--vigilance by the people, vigilance by government, and vigilance by the people over the elected and appointed officials of government charged with the responsibility of making just laws and enforcing and interpreting the rule of law.

    Dennis Jugan
    Johnstown, Pa.

     

     

        
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