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Linux, BSD developers ignore real people

A News.com reader says that Linux fans don't care about software that end users really need.

 

  
Linux, BSD developers ignore real people

In response to the Sept. 12 column by Don Soegaard, "Can't Linux do any better?":

Well, the short answer is no.

Back in 1995, I began to develop an X Windows application-development platform for touch-screen applications. I've migrated from AIX to Linux and now to FreeBSD, but the same code runs on any distribution of Linux and any variant of Unix. It's characterized by many things, including a fully rendered, application-specific GUI. It's proprietary code, but we share it with customers who ask. I have many, many installed sites--restaurants, bars, and so on. My latest customer has 250 locations.

We're also building furniture with touch screens in it: tables for food courts in malls, university dining areas, that sort of thing. We use a single computer at each site, no matter how many displays they need. And all the data is automatically encrypted and synchronized (which is one way to do backups) to any other site(s) on the Net that the customer wants. The Linux people and the FreeBSD people all do just what IBM did--they ignore us.

When they do notice us they ridicule us. So, no, Linux can't do any better. But the people who are Linux fanatics are no different than the people who build other operating systems, whether BSD or AIX or Solaris. They all have certain things in common. They don't care about end users, they don't care about software that end users really need, they don't care about companies that provide ways to rapidly and cost-effectively develop platforms for creating such software for such people.

These people are nothing more than a big bunch of smart, ignorant people who are way too impressed with themselves to even bother to pretend about applying the benefits of technology to the people of the world.

Gene Mosher
Eugene, Oregon