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Juul is giving users tools to help them quit its e-cigs

A new connected Juul device that can track -- and limit -- a person's use will be introduced early next year.

Juul

Juul Labs Chief Product Officer James Monsees at TechCrunch Disrupt in San Francisco Wednesday.

Abrar Al-Heeti/CNET

Juul is trying to help customers wean off of its own product. 

The maker of sleek, popular e-cigarettes will provide tools to help people who want to quit using its product to do so "in the smoothest possible way," Juul Labs Chief Product Officer James Monsees said at TechCrunch Disrupt in San Francisco Wednesday.

Early next year, Juul will introduce a connected device version of the e-cigarette that users would link up with their phones. After opting into prevention features, it'll help them scale back on their use of Juul if they indicate they want to do so. 

"There will be a machine learning algorithm that will smooth that out for you, so that you don't even have to really think about it," Monsees said. 

The tools will also keep other people from using the device, so that if another person (particularly someone who is underage) picks it up, it won't work.

"Basically, it's two-factor authentication for Juul use," Monsees said.

Juul has faced mounting criticism from those who say the product is luring underage customers. In April, the FDA requested information from Juul about its marketing practices and its appeal to teens, and announced an effort to stop youth from using tobacco products, particularly e-cigarettes.

"There's a long-standing history to adult-use products falling into the hands of minors." Monsees said, referencing alcohol, cannabis and tobacco. "Any underage use of these products is a problem."