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'I tell them it's 24-7, but I am lying,' -Justin Kan

A rundown on the "San Francisco-Style Video Innovation" panel at the Web Video Summit.

Publicity Still of Justin Kan Justin.TV
I am sitting in the San Francisco-Style Video Innovation panel at the Web Video Summit, listening to Justin Kan, who's been live-casting his life for 100 days now. As some of you may have heard, Justin turned off his video feed a few weeks into the experiment when things got hot and heavy during a date, and he received a decent amount of flack for his decision to stop rolling after pledging to stream his life 24-7. In today's presentation, Justin acknowledged that when promoting his site he, "tell[s] them it's 24-7, but I am lying." Not that I can blame the man; there are just times when you gotta have your privacy.

Next up is Schlomo Rabinowitz, who describes himself as "just another Jew in the media," and came into videoblogging after developing a career as a filmmaker. Schlomo's vlog has a very raw slice-of-life approach. He explained how this approach doesn't work for everything and demonstrated how the video work he does for CNET utilizes a more polished and professional approach.

Kent Bye and his partner Jen are now talking about their project Ebb and Flow, which focuses on "how inner transformation can support and sustain us through the journey of transforming our outer world." They have been utilizing Creative Common's licensing and screened a very slick looking and artistically executed short film.

Irina Slutsky, who was just introduced as "a blonde with big boobs," is discussing her collaborative project with Eddie Codell: Geek Entertainment TV (GETV). GETV began as a means to help entertain herself when Irina became bored at numerous Web 2.0 launch events. Their project has been on the Web for quite a while now, and is now part of the Podtech network.