Petition to make Clinton president largest in Change.org history

More than 4.6 million people sign an online petition calling for the Electoral College to vote for Hillary Clinton instead of Donald Trump.

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Could the Electoral College elect Hillary Clinton? Millions of people have added their name to an online petition calling for a presidential bombshell.

A petition urging electors of the Electoral College to make Clinton, not Presdient-elect Donald Trump, the next US commander in chief is the largest in Charge.org history. The petition, started by social worker Daniel Brezenoff last month, has more than 4.6 million signatures.

Change.org's next largest petition, which aims to shut down a dog meat festival in China, has tallied just 2.6 million signatures in three years.

"Donald Trump is a danger to the Constitution," Brezenoff said in a release, "and the electors have the power to stop him." The petition argues that Clinton should be president because she won the popular vote. It calls on 149 electors to ignore their states' votes and instead cast ballots for Clinton on December 19.

Wait, isn't the election over? Here's a breakdown of how the Electoral College -- and US elections -- actually work. There have been instances of electors not voting for the candidate they're pledged to, but none have affected the outcome of a US presidential election, according to FactCheck.org, a nonpartisan project of the Annenberg Public Policy Center.

The petition comes on top of a three-state recount effort launched by Green Party presidential candidate Jill Stein. Stein raised more than $9 million in donations for recounts in Wisconsin, Pennsylvania and Michigan, states critical to the 2016 election.

The Trump and Clinton campaigns didn't immediately respond to requests for comment.

In total, there are more than 6,233 petitions on Change.org related to President-elect Trump, covering everything from his administraion appointments to his positions on climage change.

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