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Google calls Microsoft a copycat (week in review)

Google accuses Microsoft of copying search results while unveiling new a new Android OS and market. Also: iPad's Daily debuts.

Google has a harsh word to describe Microsoft: plagiarist.

After noticing curious search results at Bing, then running a sting operation to investigate further, Google has concluded that Microsoft was copying Google search results into its own search engine. The story began with Google's team for correcting typographical errors in search terms, which monitors its own and rivals' performance closely.

Next came the sting, which featured a one-time code that manually ranked a page for a specific term. Google then had employees type in those terms from home using Internet Explorer with both Suggested Sites and the Bing Toolbar enabled, clicking the top results as they went. Two weeks later, Bing showed the Google results that had been hand-coded.

A Bing executive acknowledged monitoring what links users clicked but essentially described it as letting humans help gather data through crowdsourcing.

However, another executive was adamant that Microsoft was not using Google's search results.

"We do not copy results from any of our competitors. Period. Full stop," Yusuf Mehdi, Microsoft's senior VP of its Online Services Division, wrote in a post on Bing's community blog. "We have some of the best minds in the world at work on search quality and relevance, and for a competitor to accuse any one of these people of such activity is just insulting."
•  Google, Microsoft trade barbs over Bing 'copying'
•  Microsoft: Google's Bing test was 'good subterfuge'

More headlines

Now Playing: Watch this: Google's Android Market
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Google announces Web-based Android Market

Google takes the wraps off a Web version of the Android app store during an event about the Android 3.0 software known as Honeycomb.
•  How to use Google's new Android Market
•  Google wants to fight smartphone battle on Web

Google's new tablet OS: Honeycomb (FAQ)

What's new in Google's new Honeycomb Android mobile operating system, and what does it mean for the tablet market?
•  Android Honeycomb on Xoom, hands-on

Verizon iPhone preorders are smooth sailing for most

Verizon Wireless clears the first hurdle of iPhone madness without much trouble, as most customers preorder the gadget without a problem.
•  Verizon asks employees to delay iPhone purchases
•  Verizon to throttle data speeds for heaviest users
•  AT&T gets aggressive with anti-Verizon iPhone ads
•  Verizon's iPhone stands apart from AT&T's (review)
•  CNET's full Verizon iPhone coverage

News Corp.'s Daily makes its debut

The highly anticipated daily publication for the iPad launches this morning at a New York event hosted by News Corp. CEO Rupert Murdoch and Apple VP Eddy Cue.
•  Murdoch's Daily for iPad is hot--off the presses
•  Can The Daily beat free news sources on iPad?
•  The Daily: A good morning paper

Net powers: IPv4 is over. All hail IPv6!

Executives from ICANN and beyond watch the last current-generation Internet addresses depart--and warn about consequences of extending the IPv4-based Net.
•  IPv4 Internet addresses: 251 blocks down, 5 to go
•  Moving to IPv6: Now for the hard part (FAQ)

Egypt gets its Internet back

After a five-day shutdown and a pledge that President Hosni Mubarak won't seek re-election, Egyptians now can use Internet services again.
•  Google, Twitter build Speak to Tweet for Egyptians
•  Al Jazeera calls for bloggers to spread Egypt news
•  Vodafone: We were forced to send pro-Mubarak texts
•  U.S. defended Egyptian activist's YouTube videos

Senators decry link between Egypt, 'kill switch' bill

Joseph Lieberman and two other senators who hope to hand the president emergency Internet authority are protesting comparisons to Egypt cutting off the Net.
•  Internet 'kill switch'--help or hindrance? (poll)

Apple enforcing rules on e-book publishers

Apple is now telling e-book publishers that if they let people buy books outside of the app, they must also let them buy books through the app. The latter would give Apple a healthy slice of the sales.
•  Apple clamping down on App Store content

Yahoo Mail tied to Windows Phone 7 data slurp

That mysterious phantom data problem affecting some Windows Phone 7 users is now being tied to Yahoo's mail servers sending chubby code over the air.
•  Yahoo apologizes for Windows Phone 7 data bloat

U.S. clean-tech investing hit $4 billion in 2010

Venture capital investment rises 8 percent and a larger percentage of funding goes to later-stage deals, according to an Ernst & Young report.
•  Future uncertain for in-home energy 'dashboards'

Also of note
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